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Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Model B+ offers some key improvements for the same price as the original ...

The Raspberry Pi was designed to put an affordable computer into the hands of young programers. Since then, it has gone on to be used in all kinds of interesting projects, and has even found its place in the home of casual users as a media center. Now, the team is launching a new model called the Raspberry Pi Model B+, which brings some key improvements to the hardware while keeping the same US$35 price tag.  Read More

Maker firm Intridea has created an internet-connected, Twitter-controlled dice-roller

If you're ever short a pair of dice and an online alternative won't do, you need no longer despair. Maker firm Intridea has created a real-world, internet-connected dice roller that can be operated via Twitter. DiceBot will roll the dice when prompted and then respond with a picture of your score.  Read More

The Otto camera features a crank that can be popped out from the top and turned to instant...

With smartphones sporting built-in cameras, its hard to imagine a photo opportunity arising for which we'd be unprepared. But for those looking to capture moments in a form that straddles the line between stills and video comes Otto, a retro-looking digital camera that instantly captures GIFs and sends them to your phone, perhaps breathing new life into the well-worn concept of the selfie.  Read More

The PiPhone from software engineer and photographer Dave Hunt

Since its launch and slightly delayed shipping in 2012, we've seen Raspberry Pi computers used for everything from a bartender to robots to a bizarre musical instrument. Now dedicated tinkerer Dave Hunt has used a Model B to create a touchscreen smartphone called the PiPhone, though he readily admits that it would be easier and cheaper to pick up an (arguably much better looking) budget cellphone from a shop in the mall, "but hey, where’s the fun in that."  Read More

Soundwall is designed to be appreciated by both the ears and the eyes

People who love music can never quite get enough of it. They often want to listen to it for most of the day, whether at home, at work, or traveling between the two. Wireless speakers have aided this endeavor for listening at home, but they're often ugly objects you wouldn't want to have on display permanently – a problem potentially solved by Soundwall.  Read More

Joy Jackets were built as part of Cadbury's 'Joyville' campaign (Photo: Akio-Style)

One of the less practical examples of wearable technology we've seen of late is the "Joy Jacket" – a garment designed to convey a visual statement of happiness when the wearer consumes a certain chocolatier's product.  Read More

The Kano computer kit makes learning programming concepts painless (Photo: Kano)

Billed as "the computer anyone can make," the US$99 Kano kit supplies a Raspberry Pi computer board with the various accouterments (save for a display) required to make it into a complete computer. The Kano programming language uses graphic code blocks to implement a simple but powerful language reminiscent of BASIC.  Read More

iStrategyLabs has created the PiePal, a large button that connects to a Raspberry Pi and a...

Have you ever craved pizza so strongly that you wished you could press a button and have one show up automatically? Clearly the creative minds at iStrategyLabs have run into this problem more than once, since that's exactly what they made recently. Rather than wading through options on a pizza shop's website, the PiePal allows users to push a single button to immediately order one or more pizzas to be delivered ASAP.  Read More

ALARMclock is an alarm clock capable of displaying a lot more information than just the ti...

ALARMclock might look like a simple wooden alarm clock, but its meek exterior hides its true raison d'etre, which is to energize each morning by shocking users awake with facts and figures highlighting the harsh realities of life.  Read More

The assembled Poppy robot (Photo: Inria / H. Raguet)

A new 3D-printed robot called Poppy is helping a team of French researchers study bipedal walking and human-robot interaction. They were able to design, fabricate, and assemble a relatively large robot for around €8,000 (US$11,000) including servo motors and electronics. That's about a third the cost of commercial robots in the same size category like the RQ-TITAN, and is still cheaper than smaller humanoids like the Aldebaran Robotics NAO. And best of all, they plan to make their design open source.  Read More

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