Advertisement

Psychology

Wearables

Buzzing bracelet is out to stop your nasty habits

If you know someone with a compulsive behavior such as nail-biting or thumb-sucking, you may find yourself constantly telling them, "Hey, you're doing it again." The problem is, you can't be watching/stopping them all the time. That's why HabitAware's Liv was created. It's a bracelet that recognizes its wearer's problem behaviors, and vibrates to let them know that they are in fact doing it again.Read More

Science

Tech can tell if you're in love

As Valentine's Day fast approaches, many people in the thralls of a new relationship may find themselves wondering, "Does he/she really love me?". Well, if those people have access to a thermal imaging camera, they may just get their answer – at least, so a group of researchers at the University of Granada tells us. Read More

Medical

Brain scans could head off depression

A simple brain scan could identify children at risk of suffering from depression later in life, according to a new study. If implemented, the early warning test could allow doctors to carry out treatment prior to the first instance of depression, making it less likely that the patient will suffer further bouts.Read More

Computers

Courtroom fibs used to develop lie-detecting software

There's a challenge when you're developing new lie-detection software – you can get people to lie for you in a lab setting, but their behaviour won't be the same as it would be in a real-world scenario. In order to see authentic lying behaviour, you need to go somewhere where the stakes for the liars are higher. That's why scientists from the University of Michigan turned to videos of courtroom testimonies.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Smartphone usage could be analyzed to warn of depression

One of the problems with depression is that because it often forms so gradually, many people don't even realize that they're suffering from it – they just assume that normal life is pretty dreary. With that in mind, researchers from Chicago's Northwestern University have devised a method of analyzing at-risk individuals' smartphone use, to see if they're developing signs of the disorder.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Less zen, but more efficient: How the digital age is really affecting our brains

A comprehensive Microsoft study is offering insights into how living in the digital age is affecting our ability to sustain attention and how our brains are adapting to the constant flow of new stimuli. Although the results confirmed the suspicions that the information overflow is affecting our ability to focus on one task for long periods of time, the news isn't all bad, as it seems we're also training our brains to multitask more effectively.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning

    Advertisement