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Portable

— Computers Review

Review: Taking a dip in Touchjet's Pond

About this time last year, a pint-sized mashup of projector and Android computer hit crowdfunding portal Indiegogo. The TouchPico allowed users to activate icons thrown on the wall or whiteboard using a stylus-like pointing device, effectively turning any flat surface into a giant touchscreen display. We got a chance to see the pre-release prototype in action at IFA 2014, engaging the company's Slava Solonitsyn in a quick fruity game on a nearby wall. The newly-named Touchjet Pond started shipping last month, and one of the first units off the production line made its way to Gizmag for review.

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— Music

Astell&Kern launches hi-res, high price AK380 audio player

Many of us enjoy listening to a good tune or two when out and about, and a goodly proportion of that mobile music will likely be sourced from a smartphone or tablet. For those who prefer high quality sounds though, dedicated players like Neil Young's Pono and those from iRiver's Astell&Kern are probably going to be on the menu. The latter has announced a new flagship portable audio player aimed squarely at audiophiles and sound professionals, which is capable of 32-bit/384 kHz bit-to-bit decoding without the need for conversion but comes at a rather high cost.

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— Mobile Technology

Rubix On makes wireless charging easier with the power of magnets

Wireless charging is a convenient technology, allowing users to charge their smart devices without worrying about cables. But it's still young, and has some problems – specifically the fact that users need to line up the device with the charger correctly to get it to work. This can sometimes end up not being much easier than plugging in. That's why the team at Rubix is developing its On wireless charger and case, which promises to make wireless charging easier thanks to magnets. Read More
— Wearables

Nextear wireless earphones come with nifty multi-use charging case

Last year, a team of engineers led by Olle Lindén launched on Kickstarter to bring the world's smallest wireless earphones into production. The Earin campaign raised almost a million bucks from folks wanting to pop them in and strut down the street like Ryan Reynolds in Definitely Maybe. Though the slick ear bullets have yet to be shipped, they've already got some serious competition snapping at their heels. 21 year-old Australian Jonathan Zuvela has developed Nextear, equally teeny wireless in-ear headphones that come with a portable recharging case packing built-in storage and an LED flashlight. Read More
— Electronics

Blue Freedom: A mini hydropower plant for charging mobile devices

The all-new Blue Freedom kit offers yet another alternative to solar panels, fuel cells, muscle-powered dynamos, wind turbines, AC-charged back-up batteries and other portable power solutions. "The world's smallest hydropower plant" transforms the power of running water into phone chatting, internet browsing, music listening, GPS navigating and other mobile device activities, and it does so from a package built to fit in a backpack. Read More
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