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Physics

Science

Scientists design and build new energy-carrying particles

In the mysterious microscopic realm where the electromagnetic fields of light and matter intimately intermingle as they exchange energy, plasmons, excitons, and other particles with unexpected and usual properties abound. Now physicists have created a new set of energy-carrying particles to add to this range. Dubbed "topological plexcitons," these new particles show promise in greatly enhancing energy flows for solar cells and nanoscale photonic circuitry.Read More

Science

Four radioactive "babies" get their names

We all know that naming a new baby is never easy; everyone has their opinion and arguments often arise when deciding on a suitable moniker. In a similar way, the naming of new elements on the periodic table is subject to a lot of discussion and comment involving a vast range of constraints, and a committee solely dedicated to the process. Despite the difficulty and length of the process, four new elements recently added to the periodic table now have proper names that honor the places and people essential to their discovery.Read More

Inventors & Remarkable People Feature

Luke Workman interview Part 2: The million-horsepower piston crusher, the Joby S2 and leaving Zero

If you missed part one of our Luke Workman interview, check it out. He's a brilliant, fearless, joyful maniac who has so many fingers in so many pies that he's got to have an extra pair of hands somewhere to fit them on. Formerly the lead lithium battery specialist at Zero Motorcycles, Luke is now an independent contractor working on a dozen ridiculously amazing projects including the stunning Joby S2. That's just his professional life – outside hours he's constantly working on a range of backyard science projects that would scare the bejesus out of any lesser being. In part two, we discuss his million-horsepower piston crusher, his multirotor projects and his post-Zero consulting career. Plus, Loz rides the Death Bike in a bicycle helmet and a Nomex suit.Read More

Science

Researchers discover new property of light with a twist

Light is a fundamental avenue of study in physics, and its properties are well established with steadfast rules and invariable constraints. So, until recently, we thought we knew just about everything there was to know about it. But now physicists from Trinity College Dublin have added a twist to the existing canon by demonstrating a new form of light with a total angular momentum that has a half-integer spin. In other words, light that does not obey the rules.Read More

Science

Bizarre fourth state of water discovered

You already know that water can have three states of matter: solid, liquid and gas. But scientists at the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) have discovered that when it's put under extreme pressure in small spaces, the life-giving liquid can exhibit a strange fourth state known as tunneling.Read More

Science

Fermi telescope helps close in on the origin of gravitational waves

Astrophysicists made history last year when they detected gravitational waves – the elusive ripples in space-time that were first theorized by Albert Einstein as part of his theory of general relativity in 1916. Early efforts failed to pinpoint the visible light component of the chaotic event that triggered the waves. But now data from NASA's Fermi telescope has reduced the search area by around two-thirds, which will help scientists understand more about the nature of the event and improve their systems for detecting future gravitational wave events. Read More

Science

Twisting puts the brakes on light in a vacuum

The speed of light is a universal constant, but, according to scientists at the University of Ottawa, not that constant. A team of researchers led by assistant professor Ebrahim Karimi has discovered that twisted light traveling through a vacuum moves slower than the speed set by Einstein's theory of relativity, which has implications for quantum computing and communications.Read More

Physics

Fifth-dimensional black hole could cause general relativity to break down

We like to think of the physical universe as being governed by immutable laws, but maybe they're not quite as concrete as we imagine. A team of physicists at the University of Cambridge have run computer simulations that show that a five-dimensional, ring-shaped black hole could violate Einstein's general theory of relativity by creating a naked singularity, which would result in the equations behind the theory breaking down.Read More

Physics

Secrets of water-skipping revealed

Skipping stones across water may seem like an innocent children's pastime, but the science behind it has helped to win more than one war. Now, researchers at Utah State University's (USU) College of Engineering are uncovering new insights into the physics of these kinds of water impacts that could have wide applications in the fields of naval, maritime, and ocean engineering.Read More

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