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Photovoltaic


— Environment

IBM applies supercomputer cooling to solar collector for 80% efficiency

By - April 25, 2013 15 Pictures
Solar power may provide a clean, abundant source of energy, but we know the sun's rays are capable of much, much more. Aside from generating electricity, we've seen solar energy harnessed to produce drinkable water as well, so why not combine the two processes into one system? That's what IBM and its collaborators are hoping to do with an affordable High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that uses cooling technology from supercomputers to harvest solar energy more efficiently and produce purified water at the same time. Read More
— Environment

Crowdfunding success for 4th-grader solar-powered classroom bid

By - March 27, 2013 5 Pictures
After looking into the pros and cons of nine methods of electricity production (including coal, geothermal, biomass, and solar), a group of 9 and 10 year-olds from Central Park School for Children in Durham, North Carolina decided that their classroom should be powered using only energy from the sun. They hit Kickstarter at the beginning of this month with a modest funding goal of just US$800 to help finance the installation of a small PV panel array – a target that was smashed in less than a day. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Crank it up and shoot with the Sun and Cloud camera

By - March 25, 2013 12 Pictures
Though the increasingly competent cameras in smartphones are making the digital compact all-but obsolete, there is still a healthy market for novelties like the Digi Cam and Digital Harinezumi 2++. Another decidedly lo-fi cutie from the same product stable is the Sun and Cloud "self-generating" pocket camera. Its battery can be juiced up via USB, but the palm-sized snapper offers users greener charging options in the shape of a PV panel on top and a hand crank on the side. Read More
— Architecture

Zero energy home uses 40,000 recycled plastic bottles for insulation

By - March 11, 2013 32 Pictures
Italian architectural firm Traverso-Vighy and the Department of Physics at the University of Padua have teamed up to create an innovative zero-energy home dubbed “Tvzeb.” Located in the woodlands a few kilometers from the historic center of Vicenza, the home combines the use of recycled materials, geothermal and solar energy generation, LED lighting and wall and roof insulation made from 40,000 recycled plastic bottles. Read More
— Architecture

Los Angeles school gets a giant solar wall

Created by U.S. architectural firm Brooks + Scarpa, the recently completed Green Dot Animo Leadership High School in Inglewood, Los Angeles, wears its green heart very much on its sleeve. The new public school for 500 students is characterized by a large south facing façade covered with 650 solar panels, which not only help shield the building from the sun but also capture an estimated 75 percent of the energy needed to power the school. Read More
— Electronics Review

Review: XD Design's Window and Port Solar Chargers

By - March 1, 2013 15 Pictures
This time last year, we covered an interesting new solar charger that sought to avoid troublesome shadows from window frames, potted plants and household ornaments by sticking to the glass of the window itself. The Window Solar Charger from XD Design has now been joined by a new, slightly less capacious sibling called the Port Solar Charger, and I've been given the chance to take both for a test drive. Read More
— Environment

Triple-junction solar cell design could break 50 percent conversion barrier

By - January 16, 2013 2 Pictures
The current world record for triple-junction solar cell efficiency is 44 percent, but a collaboration between the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the Imperial College of London, and MicroLink Devices Inc. has led to a multi-junction photovoltaic cell design that could break the 50 percent conversion efficiency barrier under concentrated solar illumination. Read More
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