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Photoshop

An HDR still made from successive frames of video using HDRinstant

Ordinarily, cameras either expose for the dark areas of a scene by leaving everything else over-exposed, or for the brightest parts of a scene by leaving everything else under-exposed. Thanks to the advent of high dynamic range (HDR) photography, however, it's now possible to produce single images in which everything is exposed properly. Although HDR photos are typically captured with still cameras, HDRinstant software allows them to be created from frames of video.  Read More

Adobe is done with retail: it announced that it's going all in on its subscription offerin...

The pro versions of Photoshop (and the rest of Adobe’s Creative Suite) have always had a steep admission fee. In some cases, we’re talking thousands of dollars. Makes sense for big companies, but those costs put a bigger strain on self-employed pros and smaller indie operations. So it makes sense that Adobe’s Creative Cloud – which lets you rent these apps for a monthly fee – has been such a big hit. In fact, it’s done well enough that Adobe is closing the door on its retail Creative Suite apps, putting its full weight behind subscriptions.  Read More

Though Dujardin's photographs provide the building blocks for his work, the end result are...

San Francisco's Highlight Gallery will shortly host a remarkable solo exhibition of architectural imagery by Belgian artist Filip Dujardin. Note the avoidance of the word photography. Though Dujardin's photographs provide the building blocks for his work, the end result are fantastical, Photoshopped constructions depicting nonsensical or even impossible architecture.  Read More

Adobe's Creative Cloud gives subscribers access to all CS6 desktop applications and a rang...

Along with the various new features to individual applications that mark any full revision to Adobe’s Creative Suite, this year’s CS6 release saw the introduction of a new subscription model called Adobe Creative Cloud. We recently had a chance to chat with Adobe Creative guru Michael Stoddart who walked us through some of the new changes implemented in CS6.  Read More

The image was sharpened using bi-cubic interpolation on the left, and a super-resolution t...

Ever taken a digital photograph and then found out you had missed the fine details that made the scene so impressive visually? Applying a Photoshop sharpen filter may make the photo appear sharper, but such filters are lossy - they actually reduce the amount of fine detail in the image. Until recently, there was very little you could do to improve the image after the shot. That has now changed. Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have developed a super-resolution process which pulls unseen details from the nooks and crannies of a single digital photograph. Their process can capture true detail which cannot be seen in the original image - the next "killer app"?  Read More

Adobe Photoshop Touch contains some of Photoshops core features, as well as a few extras

Adobe Photoshop Touch is now available for the iPad 2. Adobe made the image-editing app official at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, and the app is already available to be downloaded from Apple's App Store.  Read More

Shadows from set geometry are accurately depicted on added objects

For more than twenty years, the software program Photoshop has been the industry standard for seamlessly manipulating images, especially the removal of unwanted items like blemishes, wires and telephone poles. When it comes to adding something to a photo, however, the process is still rather involved. Now, a team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), led by PhD candidate Kevin Karsch, is presenting a new algorithm at Siggraph Asia 2011 that promises to radically simplify the procedure of believably incorporating new or "synthetic" objects in still shots and the results are quite impressive.  Read More

On a scale of 1 to 5, how much retouching would you say was applied to the left-hand image...

Even though we know that the photos we see of models and celebrities are retouched, many of us nonetheless can’t help but think “Yeah, but even without that little bit of airbrushing, that person still looks way better than me.” For most people, such thoughts are merely a little bit humbling. For others, however, they can lead to Body Dysmorphic Disorder, eating disorders, or severely-low self-esteem – all of which can in turn have very serious consequences, including death. Perhaps if those people knew just how retouched that one photo of Mila Kunis or Ryan Gosling was, however, they might realize how much of a lie it really represented. That’s why researchers at New Hampshire’s Dartmouth College are proposing a system that objectively assesses the extent of changes made to a photograph, then displays that amount as a number rating on the published photo.  Read More

Adobe's de-blur plug-in in action

Last week we posted an audience video of the a 'sneak peek' presentation from the Adobe Max developer conference that showed a remarkable de-blurring Photoshop plug-in in development. Adobe has now posted their official high quality video of the presentation segment, and the effect is easy to see. Adobe's presentation staging is pretty awesome too. Video after the break.  Read More

A sneak peek of the amazing Adobe de-blur tool

Adobe showed what it calls a "sneak peek" of some technology at last week's MAX conference, that may or may not make its way into a future version of Photoshop (we're pretty sure it will). It's a method for de-blurring photographs by analyzing them and constructing the motion path that the camera lens followed to create the original blur. Using some highly advanced magic, the resulting blur can then be removed to an impressive degree – blurred text, for instance, becomes readable. The algorithm seems to work on low resolution phone pics just as well. Now, when they say "enhance that section right there" in just about every modern police procedural TV show, it might actually mean something. Video after the break.  Read More

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