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Origami

Materials

Transforming metamaterial alters size, volume, and shape on command

Harvard researchers have created a 3D programmable mechanical metamaterial that can be programmed to change shape, volume and size on command, making it ideal for building a range of different assemblies and structures that can be automatically altered to suit their purpose or environment. Claimed to be able to take the weight of an elephant when laid flat, the new material could be used to make everything from tiny self-deploying nanostructures for use in medical procedures, all the way up to large buildings that are able to metamorphose for different purposes on command. Read More

Around The Home

Portable bluetooth lamp glows like a sunset-filled accordion

The internet of things has brought an abundance of connected lighting options, most of which can be operated via mobile device. But what about those times when you want to create a cozy mood that's free from power outlets and wireless networks? The Bluetooth-enabled, origami-inspired Orilamp is designed to unfold and provide up to seven hours of LED light from a single charge.Read More

Materials

Origami and the art of structural engineering

From military shelters and solar arrays to batteries and drones, engineers continue to prove that origami can be the inspiration for more than just paper cranes. The latest creation inspired by the ancient art of paper folding is a new "zippered tube" design that forms paper structures with enough stiffness to support weight, but can be folded flat for shipping or storage. The scaleable technique could be used in anything from microscopic robots and biomedical devices, to buildings and bridges.

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Architecture

Origami-inspired military shelter said to cut energy use by 70 percent

The ancient art of origami has inspired all kinds of modern technological endeavors, from drones to bridges to batteries and low-cost emergency housing. The latest project to join the fold comes from US-based engineers who have developed a deployable shelter that can be shipped on a standard military pallet, improving the quality of life for soldiers while cutting energy consumption in the process.Read More

Materials

Origami "collapse" designs inspire reversibly self-folded 3D structures

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have appropriated a less-common technique of origami known as "collapse"-type, in which all folds are carried out more or less simultaneously, to create complex reversibly self-folded 3D structures around a millimeter in size. The new technique is expected to have applications in soft robotics, mechanical metamaterials, and biomimetic systems (synthetic systems that mimic systems from nature).Read More

Marine

Oru updates its foldable kayak into the new Bay+

Many foldable boat designs have passed through the pages of Gizmag over recent years – the Quickboat, the Foldaboat, the Adhoc and others. The Oru origami-style kayak seemed to be the one to make the biggest splash (yeah, bad pun), raising close to $450K (5x its goal) on Kickstarter and earning all kinds of media and industry attention, including a 2014 ISPO Product of the Year award. Rather than resting on its accomplishments, Oru has been listening to feedback and tweaking its foldable design, resulting in the all-new Bay+. Read More

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