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Ohio State University


— Automotive

Researchers develop new energy-efficient technique to weld steel and aluminum

As manufacturers, particularly in the automobile industry, continue to work toward incorporating lighter metals like aluminum with heavier steel, the ongoing problem has been how to successfully weld them together. The problem is that the high heat created in the welding process actually weakens these lighter metals, creating a less than optimum weld. After 10 years of research, engineers at The Ohio State University have developed a new welding technique that may prove to solve this problem while also using 80 percent less energy and creating bonds that are 50 percent stronger.

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— Energy

World's first "aqueous solar flow battery" outperforms traditional lithium-iodine batteries

The scientists that revealed the "world's first solar battery" last year are now, following some modifications, reporting its first significant performance milestone. The device essentially fits a battery and solar cell into the one package, and has now been tested against traditional lithium-iodine batteries, over which the researchers are claiming energy savings of 20 percent.

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— Mobile Technology

Smartphones could run 30 percent longer, by harvesting their own radio waves

Scientists have already devised systems that allow electronic devices to scavenge power from ambient electromagnetic energy sources such as radio waves. While the technology has generally been limited to small devices such as wireless sensors, a research team has recently created a scavenging system that charges a smartphone's battery, letting it last up to 30 percent longer per charge – and the system does so using radio signals emanating from the phone itself.

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— Good Thinking

Automated treadmill adjusts to its user's running speed

People running outdoors speed up and slow down without thinking about it – it just happens. On a treadmill, however, they have to manually adjust the speed of the machine. Perhaps they won't have to for too longer, however. Scientists at The Ohio State University have developed a prototype treadmill that detects when its user's running speed changes, and adjusts its own speed accordingly. Read More
— Medical

New combination of drugs slows heart decline in muscular dystrophy patients

Signs of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can start to appear in boys as young as six, leading to deterioration of the heart muscles and ultimately death. Pharmaceuticals aimed at controlling high blood pressure have been used to treat the one in 3,500 young males suffering from the condition, but a new study suggests that a novel combination of these drugs could slow the decline in heart function earlier on, and in promising new ways. Read More
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