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Ohio State University

— Mobile Technology

Smartphones could run 30 percent longer, by harvesting their own radio waves

By - May 26, 2015 1 Picture

Scientists have already devised systems that allow electronic devices to scavenge power from ambient electromagnetic energy sources such as radio waves. While the technology has generally been limited to small devices such as wireless sensors, a research team has recently created a scavenging system that charges a smartphone's battery, letting it last up to 30 percent longer per charge – and the system does so using radio signals emanating from the phone itself.

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— Good Thinking

Automated treadmill adjusts to its user's running speed

By - April 15, 2015 2 Pictures
People running outdoors speed up and slow down without thinking about it – it just happens. On a treadmill, however, they have to manually adjust the speed of the machine. Perhaps they won't have to for too longer, however. Scientists at The Ohio State University have developed a prototype treadmill that detects when its user's running speed changes, and adjusts its own speed accordingly. Read More

Swaying this way saves energy while walking

Just two days after opening, The London Millennium Footbridge was closed to eliminate its sway. Turns out staying with the sway would have had its benefits, as researchers have found that it reduces the amount of energy expended when walking across the bridge. Read More
— Medical

New combination of drugs slows heart decline in muscular dystrophy patients

By - December 29, 2014 1 Picture
Signs of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can start to appear in boys as young as six, leading to deterioration of the heart muscles and ultimately death. Pharmaceuticals aimed at controlling high blood pressure have been used to treat the one in 3,500 young males suffering from the condition, but a new study suggests that a novel combination of these drugs could slow the decline in heart function earlier on, and in promising new ways. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Video games replace eye patch to treat lazy eye

By - November 24, 2014 1 Picture
With video games having previously been found to improve decision making speeds and the brain's capacity to learn, scientists have now created challenging computer games with a fun element that significantly improved depth perception and binocular vision in people with a lazy eye. Unlike the traditional patch used to treat the condition, the video games encourage both eyes to work together. Read More
— Medical

Study indicates that C-Pulse system helps hearts heal

By - October 8, 2014 2 Pictures
When you hurt a muscle, it's usually advisable to lay off extensive use of it, until it's had a chance to heal. Well, your heart is a muscle. Although you can't just stop using it altogether when it's damaged, you can make its job easier. That's what Sunshine Heart's C-Pulse system was designed to do, and a current study suggests that it does indeed help victims of heart failure recover more quickly. Read More
— Automotive

Venturi unleashes 407 wild horses on the sand with all-electric dune buggy

By - October 6, 2014 25 Pictures
We don't hear from boutique automotive manufacturer Venturi very often, but when we do, it's always interesting news. The creator of the world's first production electric sports car revealed an updated version of its 2010 America electric dune buggy at this year's Paris Motor Show. The new concept car combines the high performance and handling of a sports car with the ever-fun design of a sand-hungry dune buggy. Read More
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