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— Science

New system gives in-city GPS navigation a big boost

Many of us use our vehicle navigation systems on a daily basis, and as self-driving cars come into common use – assuming they do – such systems will become even more important. Unfortunately, however, the GPS technology that’s integral to vehicle navigation can be thwarted by obstacles such as tall buildings. A team of researchers at Spain’s Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are attempting to address that problem, with a system that is said to drastically boost GPS accuracy in city driving. Read More
— Good Thinking

LocataNet positioning system designed to work where GPS doesn't

As anyone who's tried to use GPS indoors can tell you, global positioning systems have their limitations. For them to work properly, you have to be outdoors and you need a clear view of the sky. If you’re in the military, you also have to be sure that the enemy isn't jamming the satellite signal. For this reason, the US Air Force has awarded Canberra-based firm Locata a “sole source” contract to install a ground-based version of GPS over 2,500 square miles (6,475 sq/km) of the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico as part of a program to develop a practical supplement to GPS. Read More

Hyundai integrates Google Maps features into its cars

The seamless vehicle technology previewed by the Connectivity Concept may take a few years to become reality, but Hyundai's in-vehicle tech is getting incrementally more advanced. The Korean automaker announced today that it will integrate Google Maps application programming interfaces (APIs) into its U.S.-based Blue Link infotainment systems, underpinning a smoother navigational experience for drivers. Read More
— Space

Future spacecraft could use dead stars to navigate

The European Space Agency (ESA) wants to know if it’s possible to use dead stars as a navigational aid for traveling in deep space. To answer that question, ESA has contracted Britain’s National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the University of Leicester to investigate whether pulsars can serve as navigational beacons in the far-flung reaches of the outer Solar System or interstellar space. Read More
— Science

How bumblebees might get you faster overnight deliveries

By studying the behavior of bees, a group of researchers at Queen Mary University of London has documented and modeled the way in which the insects can fly from flower to flower and then come back to their hives expending the least amount of time and energy. The findings might lead to better, much more flexible ways to deal with problems ranging from building faster computer networks to creating more powerful microchips. Read More