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Nanotechnology

Science

Scientists can now make their own molecules

Sometimes, if you want something made right, you've just got to make it yourself. That could certainly be the case when using molecules to construct microscopic devices such as medication-delivering nano-robots. It was with such applications in mind that scientists from ETH Zurich and IBM recently developed a process for building custom molecules from mix-n-match components.Read More

Materials

Multiple bends won't crack this lightweight, paper-like, flexible ceramic

Materials to make hard-wearing, bendable non-conducting substrates for wearables and other flexible electronics are essential for the next generation of integrated devices. In this vein, researchers at the University of Twente have reformulated ceramic materials so that they have the flexibility of paper and the lightness of a polymer, but still retain exceptional high-temperature resistance. The new material has been dubbed flexiramics.Read More

Materials

In the future, we might clean our clothes using nothing but light

Even though we no longer have to beat our clothes on rocks to get them clean, laundry is still a pretty tedious chore. If researchers at Australia's Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) have their way though, the amount of time we spend measuring capfuls of liquid, scraping out the lint filter and refolding our duds may soon get slashed thanks to a new coating that cleans fabrics whenever they're exposed to light.Read More

Materials

Liquid-like graphene could be the key to understanding black holes

Researchers at Harvard University and Raytheon BBN Technology have discovered that the charged particles inside high-purity graphene behave as a fluid with relativistic properties. This find could lead to devices that efficiently convert heat into electricity, as well as graphene-based chips that can accurately model the behavior of faraway celestial objects like supernovas and black holes.Read More

Materials

Self-cleaning, anti-glare windows inspired by moth eyes

A revolutionary new type of smart window developed by University College London (UCL) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) could cut window-cleaning costs in tall buildings while reducing heating bills and boosting worker productivity. Partially inspired by the reflective properties of moth eyes, this smart window is said to be self-cleaning, energy-saving, and anti-glare.Read More

Materials

Minute "printing press" gets gold nanoparticles organized

Researchers at McGill University's Department of Chemistry have created what may be the world's smallest "printing press." Using synthetic DNA as a kind of scaffold, the scientists manipulated gold nanoparticles a millionth of an inch in diameter to form orderly structures that could have great scientific, engineering, and medical potential.Read More

Medical

Exploding nanobubbles attack cancer cells from the inside out

No cancer treatment is straightforward, but attacking a tumor in the liver is an especially problematic process that normally involves surgery. A new technique may come to offer a less-invasive approach, however, by relying on nanobubbles that sneak cancer-fighting drugs into the tumor and can be popped to release their payload at just the right time. Read More

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