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Nanoparticles

Materials

Embedded nanoparticles clear the way for smart glass devices

In a breakthrough new "direct-doping" process, scientists have embedded light-emitting nanoparticles into glass so that it remains almost perfectly transparent, but glows brightly when stimulated by lower frequency light. Able to be molded in almost any shape, and even extruded into optical fibers, the researchers claim that this new "hybrid glass" could be used to create new smart glass devices, including smart 3D displays and remote radiation sensors.Read More

Materials

Getting a grip on ivy's adhesive properties

Anyone who has tried to clear ivy from the side of their house will know the climber is almost impossible to unstick. A team at Ohio State University has studied the tiny particles giving ivy its vise-like grip, with a view to creating better medical and industrial adhesives, and even stronger armor.Read More

Physics

"World’s smallest engine" to power microscopic robots

It is often said that size matters. At the nano-scale level, where a lot of current research is being done, this adage also holds true, and several scientific teams have laid claim to creating the "world's smallest engine" built from particles of ever-shrinking dimensions. The latest, a nano-scale engine made from tiny charged particles of gold and developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, is claimed to be the smallest of them all.Read More

Medical

Nanoparticle "cluster bombs" could provide less toxic chemotherapy

Doctors have been using the chemotherapy drug cisplatin for decades, but significant toxic side effects – which can affect everything from the kidneys to the inner ear – limit its effectiveness as a treatment. A new method, which makes use of innovative nanoparticles, could change that, providing a "cluster bomb" approach to delivery that shows signs of being significantly less toxic to the patient.Read More

Medical

Nanoparticle shows if cancer treatment is working, ASAP

Knowing whether a therapy is working effectively is extremely important when treating cancer. That information can have a big impact, potentially prompting a change in treatment and improving its outcome. Right now, we don't have a method of detecting whether a tumor is reacting to medication until numerous cycles of therapy have been completed, but research by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) could change that, with a new nanoparticle treatment providing the information in as little as eight hours.Read More

Medical

Nanoparticles used to take on late-stage liver cancer

Treating late-stage liver cancer can be extremely difficult, with drugs that prove effective in healthy organs causing high levels of toxicity when introduced to cirrhotic livers. A newly-developed nanoparticle delivery system could improve the situation, with early tests showing it to be effective as a non-toxic treatment in experiments with laboratory mice.Read More

Medical

Light-activated quantum dots successfully combat drug-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly big problem for global health. They kill in excess of 23,000 people in the US every year, with their ability to rapidly develop an immunity to antibiotic treatments making them extremely difficult to eradicate. Now, new research being conducted at the University of Colorado Boulder has found that tiny light-activated particles known as quantum dots might be useful in tackling the infections.Read More

Materials

Magnesium and silicon carbide recipe results in lightweight metal with record strength

Magnesium has a number of potential advantages when it comes to engineering. It is considered the lightest of structural metals and it is the eighth most abundant element in the Earth's crust. On the flipside, however, it is not as strong and durable as some of its counterparts. Scientists are now reporting to have overcome its main limitations by infusing it with silicon carbide nanoparticles to form a new type of super-strong composite material, which they claim may lead to lighter and more efficient airplanes, spacecraft and cars. Read More

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