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Mountaineering

— Wearable Electronics

Breva's Génie 02 Terre watch features mechanical altimeter

By - January 25, 2014 9 Pictures
Altimeter watches are nothing new. They've been around for years and a quick glance at the internet will uncover some for as little as US$50. However, these altitude-measuring timepieces have one thing in common: they're all electronic. Now, for those who want to get away from the digital and have the money to do so, Breva Genève launched its Génie 02 Terre all-mechanical altimeter watch this week at the Four Seasons Hotel des Bergues in Geneva, Switzerland. Read More
— Outdoors

Trilogy helmet packs head protection for skiing, mountain climbing and biking

By - April 8, 2013 8 Pictures
Many sports require head protection, but not that many allow you to use interchangeable helmets. Every sport seems to have its own helmet designs and safety standards, so multi-sport enthusiasts end up spending hundreds of dollars on a closet full of helmets. Why can't a single helmet bridge the gap between sports? French manufacturer Cébé shows that it can, revealing a three-sport helmet that protects your head during mountaineering, skiing and biking. Read More

X-Bionic: High-tech pants tailored to mountaineering

When you're trekking, roping, scrambling and climbing up the world's tallest mountains, you can't be worrying about your clothing failing. X-Bionic Mountaineering Pants are designed to work in mountain environments and include key features that keep you lithe and comfortable for the trip ahead ... but such technologically advanced trousers don't come cheap. Read More
— Outdoors

Future Fabrics: High-tech materials attempt to beat mother nature at her own game

By - December 6, 2011 5 Pictures
A new dawn is breaking in the evolution of outdoor apparel technology. Many materials that dominate today's outdoor clothes - wool and down, for instance - have been plucked straight from nature for hundreds of years. While textile manufacturers and clothing companies have tried to improve upon natural designs, they've generally failed to come up with anything that unequivocally surpasses Mother Nature. Just beyond the action videos and gear shops though, an improved generation of materials with the potential to displace stale staples is slowly moving from test labs to retail shelves. If these materials can brave the real world and live up to the hype, outdoor apparel - and outdoor sports - will look very different in the future. Read More
— Architecture

Living-in-nature pod can be transported to the mountain peak of your choice

By - November 24, 2011 16 Pictures
This stunning alpine modular lodge is the creation of Italian design firm LEAPfactory. Dubbed LEAP (living ecological alpine pod) the modules are built entirely off-site, ready to be transported by helicopter to the summit of choice. Breaking away from traditional alpine structures, the pod is fitted with high-tech features and "at the end of its life cycle [it] can be lifted away by helicopter without leaving any permanent trace of its presence in the natural environment" says LEAPfactory. Read More
— Outdoors

Would you like some powdered beer to wash down that canned cheeseburger?

By - August 31, 2009 6 Pictures
Picture the scene: you’ve been trekking hard all day in the great outdoors, enjoying everything nature has to offer. You’ve set up camp and your canned cheeseburgers are bubbling gently on the fire. As you watch the sun sink slowly behind the mountains the only thing missing is a cold beer. Well… (beer aficionados, you may want to stop reading now) Katadyn, the Swiss-based company behind the Trek’n’Eat canned cheeseburger and other high-tech, freeze-dried foods, has developed a world first – powdered beer – to wash it all down with. Read More
— Medical

Sidelined 1950s mountain-climbing technology resurrected to help patients

By - September 23, 2008 6 Pictures
in order to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Smiths Medical and University College London have resurrected the sidelined closed-circuit breathing system designed for a failed Everest expedition over 50 years ago. Closed-circuit devices, (also known as rebreathers), create a seal over the user’s mouth, retaining the exhaled air, scrubbing it of carbon dioxide, and allowing the user to inhale it again. Read More
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