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— Science

Camera-studded dome used to reconstruct 3D motion

It might soon be possible to perform large-scale 3D motion reconstructions of sporting events or other live performances, thanks to new research by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University. The researchers mounted 480 video cameras in a two-story geodesic dome that enabled them to track the motion of events such as a man swinging a baseball bat or confetti being thrown into the air. Read More
— Science

The surprising aerodynamics behind the Brazuca World Cup football

Under the guise of World Cup fever, scientists across the globe are seizing the opportunity to examine the aerodynamic properties of what will in all likelihood be the most talked-about object on a global scale over the coming weeks, the 2014 World Cup match ball. The ball, lovingly named Brazuca by the Brazilian people, is the product of a significant amount of research and money aimed at creating the ultimate centerpiece for one of the greatest sporting competitions on Earth. Read More
— Games Feature

Video: Gizmag test-crashes the $250,000 Motionators Formula 1 simulator

Like a video game arcade on steroids, Motionators offers drivers the chance to experience the thrill of Formula 1 racing in a giant, lurching motion rig that simulates bumps, acceleration, deceleration and cornering G-forces – and crashes; very physical crashes, as the rather pedestrian Gizmag Race Team discovered. Thankfully we had budding US F2000 racer Scott Andrews on hand, who holds every lap record at the facility, to show us the way around Monaco. Read More
— Science

WiTrack system allows for motion tracking through walls

Microsoft's Kinect system is certainly impressive, but now that we've had a chance to get used to it and start taking it for granted, it does have one problem – you have to stay located in front of it. MIT's new WiTrack system, however, can track users' movements even when those people are in another room. Among other things, this could allow for video games in which the players run all over their house. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Accelerometers used to diagnose Alzheimer's

Among the behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's, one of the most prominent is a change in the "temporal structure of activities" – in other words, the amount of time that it takes the patient to do things. With that in mind, German scientists have developed a new early detection method that involves attaching accelerometers to patients, in order to assess their movements. Read More
— Robotics

Acrobatic XRL robot takes cliffs and valleys in its stride

Most land-dwelling animals with skeletons (exo or endo) have the ability to jump. It is of particular importance to survival, as running primarily consists of a long series of jumps. Without the ability to jump, a robot's freedom to move around is limited, something that is particularly true of smaller robots for which even relatively narrow trenches or low walls can prove too much of an obstacle. A robotics group at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) has taught a six-legged crawling robot to jump, giving it remarkable acrobatic capabilities. Read More