Highlights from the 2015 Geneva Motor Show

Monitoring

Ritmo Beats and PregSense are designed to make pregnancy more transparent for parents and ...

You might remember Nuvo from its prenatal music system released back in 2010, but the company's latest efforts, known as the Ritmo Beats and PregSense, are decidedly more ambitious. The two products are aimed at consumer and medical users respectively, and are designed to provide in-depth pregnancy data to both parents and doctors.  Read More

Speck detects unhealthy levels of particulates within the air in your home

Monitoring the level of particulates in the air inside the home can be a life-saver for people with health issues. A new personal air pollution monitor promises a more precise alternative, empowering users to take measures to mitigate and eliminate those tiny particles. Developed at Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Institute, Speck was presented at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Austin, Texas, that took place between March 13 and 17.  Read More

A transparent rendering of the gas-sensing capsule (Image: RMIT)

We've already heard about swallowable capsules that can transmit video from within the digestive tract. Pictures will only tell you so much, though. That's why researchers from Australia's RMIT and Monash universities have now developed a capsule that measures concentrations of intestinal gases, and sends that data to a smartphone or other device.  Read More

SINTEF scientist Ole Øystein Knudsen, with a length of the SmartPipe (Photo: Thor Nielsen/...

Undersea oil pipelines are typically inspected about once every five years ... but what happens if one of them gives out between those inspections? That's where the Norwegian SmartPipe project comes in. Initiated in 2006, it's aimed at developing self-monitoring pipelines that continuously transmit real-time status reports to shore.  Read More

A glucose sensor is drawn onto a test subject's skin, using one of the bio-inks (Photo: UC...

You've probably heard about pens with conductive ink, that allow users to draw circuits onto materials such as paper. Now, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have gone a step or two farther – they've created "bio-inks" that could be used to draw sensors onto a variety of surfaces, using an ordinary ballpoint pen.  Read More

REMPARK includes a waist worn module that keeps track of a user's motor condition (Photo: ...

A European group headed by Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain, is in the process of trialling a cutting edge system with the potential to greatly improve the quality of life for those suffering from Parkinson's disease. The system, known as REMPARK, utilizes a small waist-worn module and headset controlled by a smartphone that will allow doctors to observe and manage the symptoms of Parkinson's in real time.  Read More

The arm band can be worn against the skin or over clothing (Image: University of Tokyo)

New help may be on the way for healthcare personnel tasked with monitoring multiple patients. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have created a solar-powered arm band, that sounds an alarm if the wearer's body temperature gets too high.  Read More

Research indicates that using a smartphone app to track your activity is no less accurate ...

Although most wearable fitness-tracking devices do offer a wealth of features, the fact is that many of those features are based on the number of steps that the user has walked or run. According to a new study, inexpensive smartphone apps are just as good if not better at measuring that sort of data.  Read More

XON Snow-1 snowboard bindings provide users with feedback on their performance

One factor that snowboarders didn't previously have to consider when choosing bindings was what kind of data they could transmit. With the introduction of the XON Snow-1, however, that's now a factor. The bindings use an array of sensors to provide riders with all sorts of information on their runs, that can be used to improve their skills.  Read More

Tracky's top and pants incorporate 11 accelerometers, along with other sensors

When professional athletes are having their performance analyzed, it's certainly not unheard of for them to wear motion capture suits while training in a lab environment. Coaches and others can then analyze their movements, to see where improvements could be made. Indian startup ProjectPOLE is now offering that same feedback to everyday athletes, with its Tracky motion-tracking sportswear.  Read More

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