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Monash University

— Telecommunications

Closing the gap to improve the capacity of existing fiber optic networks

By - April 7, 2013 2 Pictures
A team of researchers working through Australia’s Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) has developed data encoding technology that increases the efficiency of existing fiber optic cable networks. The researchers claim their invention increases the data capacity of optical networks to the point that all of the world’s internet traffic could be transmitted via a single fiber. Read More
— Environment

Carbon-capture material releases trapped CO2 when exposed to sunlight

By - February 13, 2013 1 Picture
Amidst concerns over the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases, many research institutes have been looking into methods of carbon sequestration – the capture, storage and even possible reuse of carbon dioxide emissions. Unfortunately, some of the approaches require a considerable input of power, in order to release the captured CO2. A new material developed at Australia’s Monash University, however, requires nothing but sunlight. Read More
— Science

Scientists copy structure of cork to produce 3D blocks of graphene

By - December 6, 2012 2 Pictures
Imagine how limiting it would be if steel, wood or plastic only existed in the form of thin sheets. Well, that’s been the case so far when it comes to graphene. While its incredible strength and high conductivity make it very useful in things like semiconductors, batteries and solar cells, there’s no doubt that it would be even more useful if it could be produced in three-dimensional blocks. Scientists at Australia’s Monash University have now managed to do just that – by copying the structure of cork. Read More
— Science

Graphene coating makes copper almost 100 times more corrosion-resistant

By - October 4, 2012 2 Pictures
Following on from news out of the University at Buffalo earlier this year that a graphene varnish could significantly slow the corrosion of steel, researchers from Monash and Rice Universities have used a graphene coating to improve copper’s resistance to corrosion by nearly 100 times. The researchers say such a dramatic extension of the metal’s useful life could result in significant cost savings for a wide range of industries. Read More
— Music

HipDisk - bending over backwards for music

By - July 19, 2011 9 Pictures
We've seen a number of weird and wonderful musical creations here at Gizmag but we have to agree with the creator of the hipDisk when she describes it as possibly the most undignified musical instrument ever. This strange interactive sonic system is made up of a pancake tutu-like disk at the hip and another above the waist which cause a sound to be generated when the two disks meet at specific points around the edge. In order to get to those points and create simple monophonic tunes or melodies, the wearer has to twist, turn, bend or stretch so that the two conductive contact points meet. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Color-changing, heat-sensitive bandage indicates infection

By - June 9, 2011 2 Pictures
Researchers have developed a fiber that changes color in response to temperature with the aim of creating a smart bandage that can indicate the state of underlying wounds and warn of infection. With the ability to show temperature changes of less than 0.5 of a degree Celsius, the smart bandage would allow for easier and faster identification of healing problems that are typically accompanied by an increase or decrease in local temperature, such as infection or interruptions to blood supply. Read More
— Good Thinking

Student-designed Solarball creates drinkable water

By - March 30, 2011 3 Pictures
When he set out on a trip to Cambodia in 2008, Industrial Design student Jonathan Liow had no idea it was going to be a life-changing experience. Upon seeing the poverty and poor living conditions in that country, however, he decided that he wanted to build things that could help people. After hearing about the need for cheap and effective water purification in Africa, he proceeded to create the Solarball for his graduate project at Australia's Monash University. The ball is reportedly capable of producing 3 liters (about 3 quarts) of drinkable water per day, using nothing but polluted water and sunlight. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Can testosterone improve cognition in older women?

By - February 17, 2011 1 Picture
For women, the onset of midlife brings with it an array of distressing symptoms related to changes in hormone levels. The risk of dementia increases with age – particularly after the mid-60s – memory loss is a frequent complaint and quality of life is compromised as a result. Using a novel "patchless" patch method of drug delivery, researchers have been investigating whether restoring testosterone levels in older women to those of younger women will improve brain function and ultimately protect against dementia. Read More
— Computers

The anytime, interuptable universal intelligence test for people and computers

By - January 28, 2011 1 Picture
Researchers have developed an "anytime" universal intelligence test – a test that can be interrupted at any time and continued later, but that gives a more accurate idea of the intelligence of the test subject. The test, developed by researchers working in Spain and Australia, can be applied to any subject, whether biological or not, at any point in its development (child or adult), for any system now or in the future, and with any level of intelligence or speed, making it ideal for evaluating the progress of artificial intelligence systems. Read More
— Medical

Diagnosing depression in less than an hour using an ‘ECG for the mind’

By - October 16, 2009 0 Pictures
Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) cost upwards of US$2 trillion globally every year and affect one in four people in their lifetime. At present, diagnosing these conditions relies on an often unreliable process of questions and interviews, which means it can take many years for sufferers to be correctly diagnosed. A new diagnostic technique that measures the patterns of electrical activity in the brain’s vestibular (or balance) system could dramatically fast-track the detection of mental and neurological illnesses. Read More
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