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Outdoors

Hand-held microwave takes home convenience into the wild

Flicking on a gas burner or cobbling together a fire might be the most common way of cooking in the great outdoors, but another option is on the way. The Wayv Adventurer is a battery-operated radio frequency cooking appliance that's small enough to fit in a backpack. In other words, it's a hand-held microwave.Read More

Medical

Non-invasive device monitors diabetes using microwaves

For diabetics, keeping track of blood sugar can be a drag, with Type 1 sufferers having to monitor their levels as much as six times a day. A new device might make life significantly easier, providing a non-invasive solution for tracking glucose levels, without the need to extract blood.Read More

Electronics

Rocketbook digitizes your notes, just microwave it to start over

With touchscreens and keyboards never far from our fingertips these days, paper notebooks might not be as essential as they once were. But there's still something pleasant, if not always convenient, about putting pen to paper. The latest book to join a growing library of digitally inspired writing platforms is Rocketbook, and it does so with an interesting twist. In addition to shooting handwritten notes and doodles to the cloud, when it fills up users can stick the book in the microwave to wipe its pages clean. Read More

Around The Home

Thermal vision microwave shows when your food is cooked just right

For all the time they save us in food preparation, burnt tongues and frozen centers are an all too common occurrence when dealing with microwaves. But former NASA engineer-turned-inventor Mark Rober reckons nuking our food shouldn't involve so much guesswork. His take on the everyday kitchen appliance offers a thermal vision display of your food as it cooks, so you know exactly when it's time to chow down. Read More

Environment

Microwaves enable economical recycling of plastic-aluminum laminates

You may not know what they're called, but odds are you've eaten or drunk something from them. I'm referring to plastic-aluminum laminate (PAL) packaging, which has long been used for toothpaste tubes and in recent years has gained popularity in food, drink and pet food packaging. Although it threatens to approach the ubiquity of the aluminum can or plastic bottle, PAL packaging lacks the familiar recyclable logo found on cans and bottles. But that could be set to change, with a process to recover the metals contained in PAL packaging, developed some 15 years ago by researchers at the University of Cambridge, now being demonstrated in a full commercial-scale plant.Read More

Space

NASA says puzzling new space drive can generate thrust without propellant

A NASA study has recently concluded that the "Cannae Drive," a disruptive new method of space propulsion, can produce small amounts of thrust without the use of propellant, in apparent discordance with Newton's third law. According to its inventor, the device can harness microwave radiation inside a resonator, turning electricity into a net thrust. If further verified and perfected, the advance could revolutionize the space industry, dramatically cutting costs for both missions in deep space and satellites in Earth orbit.Read More

Around The Home

MOLO aims to make microwaved food taste better

There's an old trick to make microwaved food taste better: put some water in with it. This helps keep the food moist, but it's not necessarily the most elegant solution. The MOLO Moisture Lock Microwave Cover aims to take this old trick and streamline it, with a cover that integrates the water right into the top, preventing splatters while keeping food moist, all with the goal of making it taste better. Read More

Electronics

Power-harvesting device converts microwave signals into electricity

Joining the ranks of devices designed to harvest energy from ambient electromagnetic radiation comes an electrical circuit from researchers at Duke University that can be tuned to capture microwave energy from various sources, including satellite, sound or Wi-Fi signals. The researchers say the device converts otherwise lost energy into direct current voltage with efficiencies similar to that of current solar cells.Read More

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