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— Electronics

Rocketbook digitizes your notes, just microwave it to start over

By - March 15, 2015 3 Pictures
With touchscreens and keyboards never far from our fingertips these days, paper notebooks might not be as essential as they once were. But there's still something pleasant, if not always convenient, about putting pen to paper. The latest book to join a growing library of digitally inspired writing platforms is Rocketbook, and it does so with an interesting twist. In addition to shooting handwritten notes and doodles to the cloud, when it fills up users can stick the book in the microwave to wipe its pages clean. Read More
— Around The Home

Thermal vision microwave shows when your food is cooked just right

By - February 12, 2015 1 Picture
For all the time they save us in food preparation, burnt tongues and frozen centers are an all too common occurrence when dealing with microwaves. But former NASA engineer-turned-inventor Mark Rober reckons nuking our food shouldn't involve so much guesswork. His take on the everyday kitchen appliance offers a thermal vision display of your food as it cooks, so you know exactly when it's time to chow down. Read More
— Environment

Microwaves enable economical recycling of plastic-aluminum laminates

By - December 29, 2014 2 Pictures
You may not know what they're called, but odds are you've eaten or drunk something from them. I'm referring to plastic-aluminum laminate (PAL) packaging, which has long been used for toothpaste tubes and in recent years has gained popularity in food, drink and pet food packaging. Although it threatens to approach the ubiquity of the aluminum can or plastic bottle, PAL packaging lacks the familiar recyclable logo found on cans and bottles. But that could be set to change, with a process to recover the metals contained in PAL packaging, developed some 15 years ago by researchers at the University of Cambridge, now being demonstrated in a full commercial-scale plant. Read More
— Space

NASA says puzzling new space drive can generate thrust without propellant

By - August 2, 2014 6 Pictures
A NASA study has recently concluded that the "Cannae Drive," a disruptive new method of space propulsion, can produce small amounts of thrust without the use of propellant, in apparent discordance with Newton's third law. According to its inventor, the device can harness microwave radiation inside a resonator, turning electricity into a net thrust. If further verified and perfected, the advance could revolutionize the space industry, dramatically cutting costs for both missions in deep space and satellites in Earth orbit. Read More
— Around The Home

MOLO aims to make microwaved food taste better

By - December 3, 2013 6 Pictures
There's an old trick to make microwaved food taste better: put some water in with it. This helps keep the food moist, but it's not necessarily the most elegant solution. The MOLO Moisture Lock Microwave Cover aims to take this old trick and streamline it, with a cover that integrates the water right into the top, preventing splatters while keeping food moist, all with the goal of making it taste better. Read More
— Electronics

Power-harvesting device converts microwave signals into electricity

By - November 7, 2013 2 Pictures
Joining the ranks of devices designed to harvest energy from ambient electromagnetic radiation comes an electrical circuit from researchers at Duke University that can be tuned to capture microwave energy from various sources, including satellite, sound or Wi-Fi signals. The researchers say the device converts otherwise lost energy into direct current voltage with efficiencies similar to that of current solar cells. Read More
— Electronics

Cota system transmits power wirelessly at up to 30 feet

By - September 29, 2013 9 Pictures
In 2008, Gartner Research released a report in which it identified the number one IT grand challenge as "Never having to manually recharge devices." Physicist Hatem Zeine has invented what he believes to be the answer to this challenge. The Cota wireless power transmission system uses intelligently steered phased array antennas to focus a beam of microwaves on a receiver module – and only on that module. The inherently safe technology can deliver electrical power up to 30 feet from a central transmitter without any line-of-sight requirement and without interfering with other devices. The system is projected to hit the market in 2015. Read More
— Science

FINDER detects heartbeats beneath 30 feet of rubble

By - September 11, 2013 3 Pictures
Sniffer dogs and fiber optic cameras may soon be getting some assistance, when it comes to locating people trapped beneath debris. The Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate has joined forces with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to create a microwave radar-based system known as Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response – or FINDER. The new technology is able to detect a human heartbeat buried up to 30 feet (9 meters) under assorted rubble. Read More
— Telecommunications

Record 40 Gbit/s wireless data transmission rate matches it with optical fiber

By - May 19, 2013 2 Pictures
If you thought 5G wireless was fast at one Gbit/s, how does 40 Gbit/s sound? That's the new wireless data transmission record set by a team of engineers in Germany using integrated solid state mm-wave transceivers. This data transmission rate was demonstrated over a distance of 1 km (0.6 miles) and it is hoped that such links could be used to close gaps between optical networks in rural areas at a fraction of the cost of installing optical fiber. Read More

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