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Medical Imaging

Medical

Gamma camera sees skin, and what lies beneath

A new, portable imaging system could have a big impact on doctors' abilities to study patient tissue, both on a surface level, and further down. The technology combines optical and gamma imaging, and has already been successfully tested in a clinical pilot study.Read More

Medical

Robot-driven CT scanner can image standing, conscious horses

Traditional CT scanners require the patient to lay down and stay perfectly still in a narrow tube within an imposing-looking machine. It's a daunting experience, and while it's workable for human patients, it's not well suited to large animals like horses. A project taking place at the University of Pennsylvania is looking to completely change how we go about performing the scans in such cases, using two robotic arms that move around the horse while it's upright and conscious.Read More

Medical

MRIs could soon be quicker and safer

While MRI scans may not expose patients to the ionizing radiation found in X-rays, they still are potentially harmful. This is because the increased radiofrequency energy absorption associated with newer high-field and ultra-high-field MRI scanners can heat body tissue. Thanks to research being conducted at the Australian National University, however, that may soon no longer be an issue – additionally, scans could be quicker and produce higher-quality images.Read More

Medical

Tadpole-like endoscope swims through gastrointestinal tract in search of cancer

Endoscopes are essential tools for the medical examination of many organs of the human body, and are best known for their use in examining the gastrointestinal tract. Generally consisting of a flexible tube with a light source and an arrangement of lenses – or small cameras in more modern devices – the endoscope is a vital, but unwieldy tool that takes a great deal of skill to operate and maneuver around in tight areas. Now engineers have created a new device dubbed the Tadpole Endoscope, that literally swims around inside the organ of a patient and wirelessly transmits video of what it sees.Read More

Medical

CERN develops miniature linear accelerator for medical use

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is where the miraculous meets the impractical. In addition to probing the secrets of the Universe at the subatomic level, it also has potential for a variety of medical applications. Unfortunately, with a circumference of 27 km (16.7 mi) the LHC is so unwieldy that it would be about as practical as using Big Ben for a wristwatch. In the hopes of creating something a bit more useful for the medical fraternity, CERN engineers have come up with a miniature linear accelerator (mini-Linac) that, at 2 m (6.5 ft) long, is small enough to be set up in hospitals for medical imaging and radiotherapy applications.Read More

Medical

Ultrasound technique shown to reverse Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided ultrasound, a technology that involves highly-targeted ultrasound beams and monitoring their effects through imaging, has shown to help treat symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. The treatment was found to improve brain performance in the animals and has the researchers hopeful that the technique may prove effective in improving cognitive behavior in humans. Read More

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