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Mechanical

— Good Thinking

Greaseless ball bearings: A revolutionary spin on a design that's been around for ages

By - May 26, 2015 3 Pictures

The humble ball bearing is a key component of nearly every device with moving parts, taking advantage of the vastly reduced friction you can achieve when rolling a ball between two surfaces as opposed to sliding them across one another. Now, a Japanese company has come up with a simple design that removes a key component from a typical bearing – the cage that keeps the balls separated as they roll around. Coo Space's Autonomous Decentralised Bearings don't need to be greased, and according to their inventor, this fact alone can reduce their friction by up to 90 percent compared with standard bearings.

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— Motorcycles

The loco steam-powered Black Pearl motorcycle from Revatu Customs

By - April 23, 2015 15 Pictures
The Black Pearl was unveiled at the Bigtwin Bike Show in Rosmalen, Holland, next to a poster of Captain Jack Sparrow. But unlike the legendary sea vessel of the silver screen, this Black Pearl is a land vehicle powered by a steam engine. Constructed by Dutch company Revatu Customs, the two-wheeled locomotive is a fully functioning motorcycle, albeit a slow one. Read More

Artist creates animated life-size Mechanical Horse

As a child, Brooklyn-based metal sculptor Adrian Landon played with Lego a lot. He also learned about horses from his polo-playing dad, who in turn learned about them from his father, who was an equine veterinarian. That background set the stage for Landon's latest work of art, a stainless steel life-size Mechanical Horse that gallops in slow motion at the press of a button. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Montblanc's new e-Strap adds smart functionality to luxury watches

By - January 5, 2015 4 Pictures
If you want the functionality of a smartwatch, but don't want to give up your old wrist timepiece, you can always settle for an add-on module or a smartband, but they don't offer much for the haute horlogerie market – until now. The TimeWalker Urban Speed e-Strap series by Montblanc bills itself as the "first luxury brand to combine wearable technology with fine watchmaking." Read More
— Science

World's oldest computer may be older than previously thought

By - December 4, 2014 1 Picture
Since its discovery over a century ago, the Antikythera Mechanism has had scholars scratching their heads over how the Greeks managed to build a mechanical computer a hundred years before the birth of Christ and thousands of years before anything similar. But now things have become even stranger as researchers claim that it's over a hundred years older than previously believed and may have been built by a famous hand. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

HM6 Space Pirate watch has an out-of-this-world look

By - November 7, 2014 11 Pictures
When watchmaking collides with childhood memories, it usually ends with something along the lines of Mickey Mouse. But when Maximilian Büsse of MB&F was inspired by the 1970s cartoon character Captain Future, the result was Horological Machine No.6 (HM6) "Space Pirate." This luxury bit of haute horlogerie not only reflects the style of an outer space adventurer’s ship, but is also piece of high-tech mechanical watchmaking with 475 components – 80 in the case alone. Read More

Pierre DeRoche TNT Royal Rétro 43 shows that six second hands are better than one

How can an upmarket analog watch compete in a digital world? Pierre DeRoche’s answer is its TNT Royal Rétro 43, which is based on the idea that if one second hand is good, six is better. Instead of one hand taking the tiresome journey around the entire dial, the TNT Royal Retro 43 has six; each measuring a 10-second interval before passing the job off to the next in a neat bit of mechanical choreography. Read More
— Electronics

"Smart glass" iris could bring greater quality and flexibility to smartphone cameras

By - June 19, 2014 1 Picture
In a conventional camera lens, the iris consists of a set of overlapping mechanical blades that control the amount of light entering the camera. As efficient as this mechanical system is, it is too bulky and too difficult to miniaturize to be incorporated in smartphones and other compact devices. To address this, a team of researchers has used "smart glass" to create a micro-sized electronic iris that may bring much greater image quality and flexibility to smartphone cameras. Read More
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