Advertisement
more top stories »

Materials


— Science

Material with new record melting point predicted

By - July 27, 2015 2 Pictures

New research predicts it is possible to create a material with a new record-setting melting point that would have a good chance of staying intact, even at the insane temperatures in places like the outer edges of Earth's core. Computer simulations run by a team from Brown University find that a precise combination of hafnium, nitrogen and carbon would have a melting point of 4,400 kelvin (7,460° F/4,127° C).

Read More
— 3D Printing

Water-soluble filament makes creating "impossible" 3D prints easier

By - July 16, 2015 4 Pictures

3D printing has made some impressive strides in the past couple of years, allowing makers to create a wide variety of fantastic and unique designs. Despite the overall success, many prints still have limitations when it comes to structure, shape, or articulation. But 3D Systems is about to change all of that with the latest Infinity Rinse-away water-soluble support material.

Read More
— Science

Lightweight metal composite floats on water

By - May 14, 2015 1 Picture

In a development that could mean big things in the automotive and marine industries, researchers from Deep Springs Technology (DST) and the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering have created a new metal matrix composite that is so light it can float on water. In addition to having potential marine applications, the material also boasts properties that would make it suitable for use in automobile components.

Read More
— Marine

Solar-assisted, volcanic-composite sailing yacht navigating world's toughest waters

By - March 26, 2015 17 Pictures
Carbon fiber has established itself as a wonder material in vehicle construction, with its mix of low weight and high strength being prized for many of the world's most advanced vehicles of land, sea and air. Austrian company Fipofix believes that it's identified a material better-suited to the high seas, saying that its specially processed volcanic fiber-based composite, more commonly known as basalt fiber, offers a better performance-price ratio than carbon fiber or fiberglass and can be recycled after use. The company is in the process of testing the material in some of the world's most extreme marine conditions. Read More
— Science

Artificial "skin" changes color in response to minute force

By - March 13, 2015 2 Pictures
A thin and flexible chameleon-like material developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley changes color when stretched or bent even tiny amounts. With potential applications in camouflage, structural fatigue sensors, display technologies, and more, the material's color changes reliably as it gets flexed thanks to rows of ridges that are precisely etched onto a silicon film one thousand times thinner than a human hair. Read More
— Architecture Feature

Creative AI: Algorithms and robot craftsmen open new possibilities in architecture

Computers have transformed architecture in remarkable ways. They've made it possible to visualize designs in fully-rendered 3D graphics and to automatically check designs against building codes and other standard specifications. And they've made designs possible that were unthinkable or unimaginable 50 years ago, as they can crunch the numbers on complex equations and even generate plans or models from high-level requirements. Architecture, like music, art, games, and written stories can be created algorithmically. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement