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Marine


— Outdoors

Kingii wrist-worn floatation aid to keep you afloat

By - July 6, 2015 15 Pictures

Flotation vests save thousands of people from drowning every year, but they aren't of any use if they aren't actually worn. Despite their utility, many people choose not to wear such vests for reasons of comfort, fashion, or space, so Kingii is marketing what is calls the world’s smallest inflatable as an alternative. The focus of an Indiegogo campaign, the wrist-worn device is aimed at swimmers, surfers, sailors, and others who like getting their feet wet.

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— Marine

Wärtsilä's new 31 becomes the most efficient 4-stroke diesel engine in the world

By - June 22, 2015 4 Pictures

Finnish engine manufacturer Wärtsilä must be a fascinating place to visit. The company manufactures some of the most mind-bendingly enormous marine diesel engines in the world, like the record-breaking, 89-foot high, 44-foot long, 110,000 horsepower RTA96-C we wrote about more than 10 years ago. Now, Wärtsilä has another entry in the Guinness Book of Records ... for the world's most efficient 4-stroke diesel engine.

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— Marine

The 3 boats-in-1 Van Diemen Sports Limousine super yacht tender

By - April 15, 2015 23 Pictures
The all-new Sports Limousine from Tasmania's Van Diemen Luxury Crafts joins the swelling legion of convertible, multi-use boats that includes the sports coupe-styled Revolver 44 GT and the Kormoran super-transformer. The Sports Limousine goes a step beyond the basic electric hard-top convertible, adding an electrically raised glasshouse to create three distinct body styles for a myriad of on-water uses. It's a cozy fishing boat, a roomy, semi-enclosed limousine, and a compact tender in one. Read More
— Marine

Solar-assisted, volcanic-composite sailing yacht navigating world's toughest waters

By - March 26, 2015 17 Pictures
Carbon fiber has established itself as a wonder material in vehicle construction, with its mix of low weight and high strength being prized for many of the world's most advanced vehicles of land, sea and air. Austrian company Fipofix believes that it's identified a material better-suited to the high seas, saying that its specially processed volcanic fiber-based composite, more commonly known as basalt fiber, offers a better performance-price ratio than carbon fiber or fiberglass and can be recycled after use. The company is in the process of testing the material in some of the world's most extreme marine conditions. Read More
— Science

Robot sub beats nets for discovering what lurks at the bottom of the sea

By - January 13, 2015 2 Pictures
Curious about what's living on the deep sea floor? Well, the Autosub6000 AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) is helping us find out. Led by Dr. Kirsty Morris, a team at the UK's National Oceanography Centre (NOC) has equipped one of the unmanned submarines with a high-resolution photographic system. As a result, it's claimed to be far more effective at identifying deep-sea life than the usual approach of scientific trawling. Read More
— Marine

The coolest water toys of 2014

By - December 22, 2014 50 Pictures
We looked at 2014's coolest land toys earlier this month; now we leave the shore in our wake and head out to sea. The year in water toys kicked off in a big way at Boot Düsseldorf 2014 in January and it ran strong the year through. In fact, we'd say the past year saw reveals and market launches of some of the coolest water toys in recent history ... everything from transforming boats, to seven-figure personal submarines to underwater jet packs. Read More
— Military

US Navy introducing system to help commanders plot the best course

By - December 21, 2014 1 Picture
One thing that is guaranteed to put a naval ship commander in front of a court martial is running aground. Unfortunately, despite all the advances in satellite technology and other aids, navigation is still as much an art as a science – and a very time-consuming one at that, with it taking days and sometimes weeks to chart out a mission. To free up captains and reduce their chances of having to answer awkward questions, the US Navy is introducing a new automated navigation planning system into its surface fleet that speeds up course planning and reduces the chance of human error. Read More
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