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Maker Faire

— 3D Printing

Wasp's 3D printers produce low-cost houses made from mud

A need to address a lack of housing for the globe's growing population has turned up some eye-catching efforts, blending creative architecture with new, sustainable technologies. And it is increasingly looking like 3D printing could have a role to play. Italian firm Wasp is the latest to explore the potential of additive manufacturing in this area, developing a super-sized 3D printer capable of producing low-cost housing made from mud. Read More
— Automotive

Toyota unveils Maker Faire-inspired Urban Utility concept vehicle

Maker Faires are not only places for do-it-yourselfers, innovators and inventors to share their latest and greatest creations with each other, but are also hugely popular with the general public. The Bay Area Maker Faire a few months back, for example, attracted 1,100 exhibitors and 130,000 visitors. Now Toyota is looking to capitalize on the buzz surrounding the Maker movement with a new Urban Utility concept vehicle called the U2. Read More
— Electronics

Up close with Zeus, the first consumer all-in-one 3D printer, scanner and fax

3D printing might be awesome, but so far it's mostly been the realm of design geeks and passionate tinkerers. The Zeus from AIO Robotics seeks to merge 3D scanning and printing with the push-button simplicity of today's consumer all-in-one printer/scanner/fax machines. In the process, the company also created the closest thing we've seen so far to the Star Trek replicator, with the added bonus of what you might call "ToIP" – Teleportation over Internet Protocol. Read More

World's cheapest 3D printer moves forward

Over 1,400 backers committed over $400,000 to the crowdfunding campaign for the $199 QU-BD 3D print. The Little Rock, Arkansas-based company has been scrambling to fulfill all those orders ever since, but have managed to also bring forth a few new versions of their 3D printer kit and also prepare to start taking new orders. Read More
— Electronics

Touch Board and electric ink create a jammin' music machine

In a world increasingly dominated by touchscreens, a London design studio is taking an approach to touch that's both low(er)-tech and innovative at the same time. Bare Conductive raised over US$200,000 on Kickstarter last year for an Arduino-based project called Touch Board that turns any conductive material into a potential capacitive touch input, including the firm's own conductive electric paint. Gizmag's Eric Mack was able to see the Touch Board in action and speak with co-founder Matt Johnson at the Bay Area Maker Faire. Read More