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Magnetic

— Mobile Technology

Magnetyze smartphone charger swaps cords for magnets

By - January 10, 2013 6 Pictures
Phone chargers may not be way up there on peoples’ lists of troublesome devices, but if the things can be made simpler ... hey, why not? BuQu Tech’s new Magnetyze system attempts to do just that, with a magnetic case/charger combo. Users just place their Magentyze case-clad smartphone near the slab-like desktop charging platform, and it will be magnetically sucked into place and charged up – no cords need to be plugged in. Read More

New Year rolls around in style with ONE calendar

For much of the socio-economic West, new year is set to roll around in approximately 14 days. For South Korean designer Jeong Yong, the rolling around is likely to occur literally as well as figuratively, being that Yong is the designer of the ONE Table Calendar, a multi-ringed calendar and magnetic designer corporate play-thing. Read More
— Automotive

Researchers charge cars with "remote magnetic gears"

By - October 31, 2012 4 Pictures
Wireless charging systems seem like an easy way to keep electric cars running. You just drive up to a charge point and let the system beam power to your battery without ever having to step out into the cold and rain. However, these systems require high-frequency electromagnetic fields that can interfere with electronics and pose potential health hazards. To keep the hands-free advantages of wireless, yet get rid of the high-frequency fields, physics professor Lorne Whitehead and his team at the University of British Columbia (UBC) have developed an electromechanical vehicle charger that uses “remote magnetic gears”s instead of electrical coils Read More

The magnetic sands of Normandy

Sandy beaches are a delight for swimmers, surfers, sailors, and people strolling down the boardwalk. A horde of beautiful shells and buried coins (not to mention the occasional dropped ring) awaits the skilled beachcomber. Beach sand also carries within it a variety of traces of the history of that beach. A prime example is the magnetic sands of Normandy. Read More
— Environment

MIT researchers devise technique to clean up oil spills using magnets

By - September 12, 2012 1 Picture
Possibly the only good thing to come out of the Deepwater Horizon disaster is the subsequent increase in research into finding more effective ways to clean up oil spills, including such initiatives as the X PRIZE Foundation's Wendy Schmidt Oil Cleanup X CHALLENGE. Joining the list is a new method devised by researchers at MIT who propose separating oil and water using magnets. The new technique would allow the oil to be recovered to help offset the costs of the cleanup operation. Read More
— Science

Magnetically-labeled blood cells could provide a boost to medical research

By - July 12, 2012 1 Picture
Thanks to advances in stem cell therapy, it is now possible to use engineered white blood cells to fight diseases such as HIV within the human body. When such treatments are being developed, however, it can be difficult to track where the introduced cells travel within a patient’s system, and how many of them make it to their target. Now, thanks to research being carried out at the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Cardiovascular Science, those cells can be magnetically labeled. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Magnetic field anomalies used to pinpoint your location in a building

By - July 10, 2012 4 Pictures
While GPS tracking tends to be ineffective inside buildings, alternative indoor positioning solutions require the presence of Wi-Fi network access points or other beacons ... or at least, that was the case before a Finnish start-up called IndoorAtlas stepped onto the scene. Its software uses your phone’s built-in compass and measures the anomalies in the Earth’s magnetic field to pinpoint your location in a building with the accuracy ranging from 0.1 meter to 2 meters (3.93 inches to 6.56 feet). If spiny lobsters can do it, so can we, the logic goes. Read More
— Medical

Handheld DMR spectrometer diagnoses cancer in an hour

By - June 26, 2012 5 Pictures
Magnetic resonance. We all think of the massive multimillion dollar magnetic resonance imaging machines into whose gaping mouth we are slowly propelled on a motorized table, ready to have our smallest flaws exposed. But the phenomenon of magnetic resonance has other medical uses. A team of physicians and scientists led by Prof. Ralph Weissleder of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has developed a handheld diagnostic magnetic resonance (DMR) device that can diagnose cancer in an hour with greatly improved accuracy compared to the current gold standard. The DMR technique is sensitive enough that only material from a fine needle aspiration biopsy is needed for the test - a far less painful experience compared to the usual surgical or core needle biopsies. Read More
— Good Thinking

ZeroN system holds a ball wherever you place it, in mid-air

By - May 9, 2012 5 Pictures
People who saw the 1984 film 2010: The Year We Make Contact might remember a scene in which Roy Scheider, while describing the orientation of the spaceship that he’s aboard, picks up a pen and places it in mid-air in front of himself. While that effect was actually accomplished using a sticky-sided pen and a very clear plate of glass, the same sort of thing is now actually possible – if you’re in the right place, and positioning the right object. The place is MIT’s Media Lab, and the object is a small plastic-coated spherical magnet called ZeroN. Users can physically place it anywhere within a specified three-dimensional block of “anti-gravity space,” then watch as it stays in place when they let it go. It can also move through the air on its own, and even function as a virtual movie camera. Read More
— Games

MoleBot gaming interface blends the virtual and physical

By - May 8, 2012 3 Pictures
In the days of yore, families would gather round the table of an evening and play board games like Monopoly and Risk. With such games moving into the virtual world and now available online, even those playing the same game under the same roof can be tucked away in their own corner of the house. An innovative game robot concept out of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) called MoleBot attempts to reverse the trend by providing a physical environment that allows users to physically interact with a virtual game world. Read More
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