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Magnetic


— Science

ARC reactor design uses superconducting magnets to draw fusion power closer

By - August 16, 2015 2 Pictures

Fusion power can seem a bit like the last bus at night; it's always coming, but never arrives. MIT is working to change that with a new compact tokamak fusion reactor design based on the latest magnetic superconductor technology. The ARC (affordable, robust, compact) reactor design promises smaller, cheaper reactors that could make fusion power practical within 10 years.

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— Science

Magnetism generated in non-magnetic metals

By - August 10, 2015 1 Picture
By subtly altering certain quantum interactions in matter, scientists from the University of Leeds have shown for the very first time how to generate magnetism in metals that aren’t normally magnetic. Synthetic magnets made using this technique may one day reduce our reliance on rare or toxic metals in such things as wind turbines, computer hard drives and magnetic field medical imaging devices.

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MagKey uses magnets to stop keys jangling

Occasionally an invention comes along that promises to change mankind fundamentally, enable us to grow as a species, and expand our capabilities beyond what was previously thought possible. MagKey isn't one of those kinds of inventions at all. It simply uses magnets to stop keys from jangling, but we're still impressed.

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— Computers

IBM sets new tape storage record

By - April 13, 2015 6 Pictures
For many people, tape memory is a dead technology found only on reel-to-reel computers in old 1960s movies. However, it’s still a major storage medium and a new breakthrough by IBM Research and Fuji Film has produced a low-cost particulate magnetic tape with a record density of 123 billion bits of uncompressed data per square inch, which represents 88 times more capacity than 2012's LTO-6 tape cartridge. Read More
— Medical

Magnetic nanoparticles open blood-brain barrier for delivery of therapeutic molecules

By - March 26, 2015 1 Picture
The blood-brain barrier is a highly selective semipermeable barrier running inside almost all vessels in the brain that lets through water, some gases and a few other select molecules, while preventing potentially toxic elements in the blood from entering the brain. Researchers from the University of Montreal, Polytechnique Montréal, and CHU Sainte-Justine say that currently 98 percent of therapeutic molecules are also blocked by the barrier, but they have developed a technique using magnetic nanoparticles that opens the door for such molecules, thereby also opening the door to new treatments for brain diseases. Read More
— Science

Tiny robotic hand-like grippers dissolve in the body after performing task

By - February 24, 2015 1 Picture
Creating swarms of soft, robotic hands that can safely dissolve within a living body once they've performed surgical procedures or delivered drugs just got a step closer thanks to work done by John Hopkins University scientists. They've created minute biodegradable microgrippers by adding stiff polymers containing magnetic nanoparticles to soft hydrogels, allowing them be magnetically guided to any location in the body. Read More
— Electronics

Skin-applied foil could give people a sense of "magnetoception"

By - February 3, 2015 4 Pictures
How would you like to be able to sense magnetic fields? It could come in handy, given that some animals navigate and maintain their spatial orientation by doing so. Well, we've now come one step closer to humans having that ability, too. Scientists from Germany's Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, along with colleagues from the University of Tokyo and Osaka University, have developed a thin, flexible magnetoresistive sensory foil that can be applied to a person's own natural skin. Read More
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