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Lightning


— Music

Audeze EL-8 Titanium headphones shun iPhone audio jack for Lightning port

Whatever your mobile music poison, there's a good chance that your earphones or headphones are plugged into the tune-playing source hardware via the 3.5 mm audio jack. Earlier this year we reviewed some earphones from Hong Kong-based Zorloo that took a wholly different route, and one that served up a good slice of high resolution goodness in the process. The new EL-8 Titanium headphones come shipped with an audio cable which, like the Z:ero earphones, sports a built-in headphone amp and high resolution DAC in the cable. But this one ends in a Lightning connector.

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— Computers

PhotoFast flashdrive speedily shuffles data between Lightning and USB 3.0 devices

When it comes to portable gadgets, small, fast, and capable are ideal attributes to look for. Devices that are compatible across multiple platforms also provide users the added benefits of convenience and consolidation. PhotoFast's latest accessory, the i-FlashDrive Max USB 3.0, merges those desirable features into an ultra-small, ultra-speedy flash drive for fast data transfer between Mac, iOS, Windows, and Linux systems.

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— Science

First optical spectrum taken of ball lightning

A scientific team in China fortuitously recorded the first optical spectrum of an example of ball lightning. The ball lightning, which was accompanied by a cloud to ground lightning strike, appears to have consisted at least partially of vaporized soil from the location of the strike. While ball lightning may result from a variety of sources, this observation provides considerable evidence that the vaporized silicon explanation is valid, although possibly not unique. Read More
— Military

U.S. Army weapon shoots lightning bolts down laser beams

Thought that title might get your attention, but shooting lightning bolts down laser beams is just what a device being developed at the Picatinny Arsenal military research facility in New Jersey is designed to do. Known as a Laser-Induced Plasma Channel, or LIPC, the device would fry targets that conduct electricity better that the air or ground that surrounds them by steering lightning bolts down a plasma pathway created by laser beams. Read More
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