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Lighting

Good Thinking

Footballers' pounding feet power community soccer pitch lights

Just over three years ago, a UK company looking to harvest the kinetic energy of pedestrians received its very installation order. Since then we've seen Pavegen's tiles turn to the crowd for school installs and being laid at the Paris Marathon. Now the firm has partnered with Shell for its biggest undertaking so far – to give a run-down community soccer field in a Rio de Janeiro favela an off-grid power supply which benefits the whole community.Read More

Architecture

Wembley Stadium arch to become interactive lighting display

Earlier this year, mobile operator EE announced a partnership with the home of the England national soccer team, Wembley Stadium. The six-year deal includes the installation of "state-of-the-art technologies" at the stadium. Amongst these is an LED lighting system that will illuminate the stadium's arch based on fan sentiment on social media.Read More

Drones

Disney may use the magic of drones in future theme park shows

The weird and wonderful world of Disney may be about to get a little more weird and wonderful, depending on how you feel about drones. The Walt Disney Company has filed three patents suggesting it may intend to deploy unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to control giant marionettes, replace fireworks and suspend floating displays in its future theme park shows. Read More

Outdoors

Big Agnes integrates LED lighting system into camping tents

Flashlights, lanterns, headlamps, tent lights … there are a lot of different ways to light up a campsite. Colorado-based outdoor specialist Big Agnes adds one more: the tent. More specifically, the company's mtnGLO tent range, which feature built-in LED lighting so there's no more fidgeting around for a flashlight that has rolled into a dark, cold corner. Read More

Drones

Aerial drones may find use as smart photographic light sources

As any professional photographer knows, setting up lights can be a hassle. This is often the case in the studio, but especially when shooting on location. Before too long, however, it may be possible to use hovering autonomous drones as light sources. In fact, that's just what a team from MIT and Cornell University has already done. Their system not only does away with light stands, but the light-equipped aircraft automatically moves to compensate for movements of the model or photographer. Read More

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