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Lenses


— Digital Cameras

Backer Capper allows for one-handed lens-swapping

Have you ever tried changing lenses on a DSLR, in a situation where you had to keep hold of the camera the whole time? The problem is that it essentially requires three hands. You need two hands to twist off the old lens and put its rear protective cap on, and to un-rear-cap the new lens and twist it onto the camera – your non-existent third hand, meanwhile, is required to hold the camera body. Because photographers are in reality limited to two hands, they instead perform a sort of awkward juggling act, in which they risk dropping the camera or one of the lenses. The Backer Capper, however, is a product-in-development that’s designed to make the task considerably easier. Read More
— Medical

Superbug-killing coating "magnetically" draws in bacteria

Scientists at Singapore's Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have created a "magnetic-like" coating that traps and destroys 99 percent of the bacteria and fungi that it encounters. The antibacterial coating has been shown to be effective against superbugs like Staphylococcus aureus and is already being used in the manufacture of contact lenses. As well as finding numerous biomedical and household applications, the research could lead to new wound treatments and even be used to target bacterial infections inside the body without the use of conventional antibiotics. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Mammoth fisheye lens from the 1970s sells for £100,000

It's getting rarer these days to find the kind of specialist shops that have so much stock from years gone by that they're more like a mini-museum than a retail outlet. Grays of Westminster is just such an emporium. Exclusively dealing in products spanning the whole history of the Nikon Corporation, the award-winning central London curiosity shop managed to generate a huge online buzz this week by announcing the sale of an exceptionally rare monster of a wide-angle Nikkor lens for an equally gargantuan price of £100,000 (US$162,312). Read More

Lensbaby Composer Pro for mirrorless cameras

Having provided DSLR owners with the power to exercise some in-camera creativity for a little over a year, Lensbaby has now announced new versions of its Composer Pro lens to fit a variety of mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras. The latest Composer Pro mounts will ship with the Double Glass Optic installed and, like the SLR version, are compatible with Lensbaby’s Optic Swap System. Read More
— Science

New process could revolutionize electron microscopy

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have created what sounds impossible - even nonsensical: an experimental electron microscope without lenses that not only works, but is orders of magnitude more powerful than current models. By means of a new form of mathematical analysis, scientists can take the meaningless patterns of dots and circles created by the lens-less microscope and create images that are of high resolution and contrast and, potentially, up to 100 times greater magnification. Read More
— Outdoors

Dual Eyewear sunglasses provide bifocal lenses for reading bike computers

Attempting to read your watch or bike computer through sweat-fogged glasses while simultaneously keeping half a pupil on the road ahead can be difficult and dangerous. And those expensive electronics don't do you much good if you can't read them. That's why Dual Eyewear has created sunglasses equipped with magnifying lenses that make reading those small, grainy LCD screens a little easier. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Pentax Ricoh and Marc Newson create new K-01 camera with world's thinnest interchangeable lens

Pentax Ricoh and acclaimed designer Marc Newson have joined forces to create a new 16 megapixel mirrorless camera and a new pancake lens that's claimed to be the world's thinnest interchangeable lens. The Pentax K-01 interchangeable lens camera (pronounced "kay zero one") is also said to be compatible with over 25 million previously-produced Pentax K-mount lenses. Read More
— Sports

Anon ski goggles use magnetic lenses for easy swapping

The problem with the interchangeable lens systems commonly used in ski goggles is that they're tedious to work with. You have to slowly tear the frame from the original lens, line the grooves of the replacement lens up just right and then snap it back together section by section. Not only is this the type of thing you might need to get a table in the cafeteria for, it's the type of thing that could haunt you all day if you inadvertently put the lens in cockeyed. The Anon M1 goggles make switchable lenses easier and more seamless than they've ever been. Magna-Tech is a simple design upgrade that lets you remove your original lenses and snap the new ones in place within seconds. Read More
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