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LED


— Telecommunications

Fujitsu tech enables LED-lit objects to transmit data to smartphones

Currently, if you want to know more about an item displayed in front of you, one of the most common methods of doing so involves scanning its QR code ... if it has one. The problem with those codes, along with things like RFID and NFC tags, is that they detract from the appearance of the item. Fujitsu Laboratories, however, has developed an alternative system. It uses the light shining on the object to convey data. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

The Division Furtive Type 50 shines light on tired timepieces

To the timepiece layman such as myself, most wristwatches are bland, uninspiring tools that do one job. They do that one job extremely well, of course, but they all – with the exception of innovative watches from companies such as TokyoFlash – meld into one inglorious whole. They do exactly the same thing, and do it in exactly the same way. Which all conspires to make it very easy for the Division Furtive Type 50 to stand out from the crowd. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People

2014 Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to inventors of blue LEDs

Thomas Edison may have invented the lightbulb, but he never received the Nobel Prize for it. Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano at the University of Nagoya, and Shuji Nakamura working at Nichia Chemicals in Tokushima, Japan have proven more successful, being awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics for their invention of the blue LED, which is the key to modern energy-efficient lighting. Read More
— Electronics

Breakthrough in LED construction increases efficiency by 57 percent

With LEDs being the preferred long-lasting, low-energy method for replacing less efficient forms of lighting, their uptake has dramatically increased over the past few years. However, despite their luminous outputs having increased steadily over that time, they still fall behind more conventional forms of lighting in terms of brightness. Researchers at Princeton University claim to have come up with a way to change all that by using nanotechnology to increase the output of organic LEDs by 57 percent. Read More
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