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Learning

Science

Augmented reality atom kit makes hands-on chemistry easier to grasp

Growing kids tend to repeat all sorts of colorful language heard while at school, yet there's one particular C-word that causes some parents to feel a special type of dread. Chemistry. A new teaching tool raising funds on Indiegogo adds an innovative twist to the traditional chemistry model kit in a way that should make the subject more accessible and enjoyable for parents and students alike. Happy Atoms combines augmented reality with a physical product to educate students about the wonderful world of molecules.Read More

Electronics

Elex Pipe takes circuit building off the board

Though we use all manner of electronic gadgetry every day, few of us know what makes them tick. Learning about electronics and programming can be tough though and, let's face it, a little dry. A number of startups have made efforts to spice the learning process up recently – making use of robots, modules and micro labs to make experimentation fun and accessible. The latest to join the crowd is Mad Tatu with a circuit building system that rises up from the table top for 3D projects that look like a crazy plumber has turned his hand to teaching. Read More

Robotics

Menacing walker teaches kids to build robots

The ZeGoBeast Electric is a large, mean-looking built-it-yourself walking robot that's designed to be as simple to build as possible, with step-by-step guides available both digitally and in paper form. The team hopes that the new DIY walker will become a tool for learning about programming and electronics.Read More

Music

Digital accordion to get a compact cousin

After building a computer/MIDI controller, synthesizer, sequencer and follow-me learning system around a novel musical note arrangement, French startup Dualo started shipping the intriguing du-touch in the latter half of 2014. Next month the company is set to hit crowdfunding platform Kickstarter to bring a smaller version to life – the du-touch S.Read More

Automotive

Calling all test drivers 10 and younger

Anyone who sat behind the wheel of a car as a kid and imagined they were driving it may wish they could turn back the clock and move to the UK. Young Driver Motor Cars Limited recently completed production of a two-seater car designed specifically for kids from five to ten years old, and they're looking for test drivers to give it a go.Read More

Robotics

Furry educational robot tweaks its approach in response to emotions

Keeping large groups of young minds engaged in the classroom can be a tall order for educational staff, because what motivates one student might not necessarily motivate the next. Working towards a future where each and every student benefits from personalized attention, MIT researchers have built an educational robot that interacts with kids and learns how to motivate them individually over time.Read More

Music

Slide on chord shaper will have you strumming in minutes

Learning to play guitar like an axe god isn't easy. It takes time and dedication and many, many hours of study. Hardly surprising, then, that many would-be noodlers give up even before the first calluses start to form. We've been introduced to a good many teaching aids over the years, including those which light up the fretboard, others that transform learning into addictive games and even complicated keyboard-like overlays. University of Texas graduate Alex Levine says that his Guitar Now system will have students playing three major chords in minutes, allowing players to strum along to hundreds of songs by the likes of Taylor Swift, The Beatles and the Foo Fighters in no time.Read More

Drones

Drones could follow trails to find lost hikers

It's becoming increasingly likely that in the not-too-distant future, a drone may be what finds you if you're trapped in rubble at a disaster site. Now, it's also looking like one might come to your aid if you should get lost in the woods. That's because scientists have developed machine learning-based software that already allows quadcopters to follow forest paths better than humans.Read More

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