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Laser

— Materials

New technique may make materials hotter than the Sun's core in 20 quadrillionths of a second

If some people get impatient waiting for a soft-boiled egg to cook, that's nothing compared to a group of theoretical physicists at the Imperial College London. They've come up with a new method that could allow lasers to heat certain materials to temperatures hotter than at the Sun's core in 20 quadrillionths of a second. The new technique would reportedly be 100 times faster than the world's most energetic laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, and may one day have applications in future fusion research.

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— Space

Asteroid Impact Mission sets sights on new laser communications record

Laser-based communications has the ability to beam enormous amounts of data at high speed, but the use of this technology in space is still in its infancy. To help push things along, ESA’s proposed Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) will carry out a record-setting demonstration of space laser communications across a distance of 75 million kilometers while orbiting a binary asteroid.

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— Space

NASA tests CubeSat-based laser communications

NASA has teamed up with The Aerospace Corporation of El Segundo to test a new CubeSat-mounted laser communication system. While the mission, known as the Optical Communications and Sensor Demonstration (OCSD), has already been successfully placed in orbit, the team is currently working to resolve an issues with its attitude control system.

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— Around The Home

Skarp Razor shaves with lasers instead of metal blades

Laser technology has come a long way over the decades, having made leaps from science fiction to science fact within the medical field, manufacturing, and even as a "death star" beam to help unlock the mysteries of the universe. But the latest laser-enabled concept is something the average consumer can more readily appreciate. The Skarp Razor may become the first-ever personal shaving tool powered by a laser.

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— Physics

World's first white laser demonstrated

Incandescent bulbs, LEDs, and CFLs may soon have to budge up because a new lighting technology is in town – white lasers. Using nanotechnology to create a bespoke semiconducting material, a team of scientists at Arizona State University has developed a laser that can produce white light that is brighter and more efficient than LEDs.

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— Medical

Laser device may soon non-invasively monitor diabetics' glucose levels

In order to monitor their blood glucose levels, diabetics typically have to perform painful and inconvenient finger-prick blood tests – in some cases, several times a day. Using an implantable glucose-monitoring sensor is one alternative, although it must be surgically installed and subsequently removed for replacement. Another option may be on the way, however, in the form of a device that simply shines a laser on the user's finger.

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