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Kickstarter

— Electronics

HeLi-on flexible solar panel rolls up to portable power party

Compact solar panels have been around for some time, but in a trade-off with portability many are too small to generate practical amounts of electricity over short periods. New designs, such as the Yolk Solar Paper, are capable of generating more electricity while maintaining a slim profile, but the HeLi-on further expands on the idea of portable power generation with a flexible solar cell that rolls out from a compact package to soak up more rays.

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— Pets

The Jellyfish Cylinder Nano provides jellyfish relaxation for the novice

Jellyfish are so relaxing to watch that they're the bonsai tree or lava lamps of the pet world. Unfortunately, they're also so fragile that they can't be kept in conventional saltwater aquaria, so they need to be kept in special tanks. In 2011, Jellyfish Art introduced its first tank and now is rolling out an improved version on Kickstarter called the Jellyfish Cylinder Nano, which boasts a self-contained support system and LED lights.

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— Bicycles

Bicycle inner tube pumps itself up as you ride

It was three years ago that we first heard about inventor Benjamin Krempel's PumpTire – it was a prototype bicycle tire that used wheel motion to keep itself inflated. While it was an interesting idea, it would require users to give up their existing tires, plus the peristaltic pumping mechanism would be compromised once the tread wore away. Well, he has now come up what sounds like a better alternative: the PumpTube.

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— Digital Cameras

YoCam takes a shot at recording life, action with greater versatility

Life loves to present us with incredible and/or unexpected situations, but unless someone has a camera actively recording, those moments lose the potential for widespread sharing. Mofily is taking aim at people looking to capture just such events. Its pocket-sized YoCam is designed to be an all-in-one camera that can be worn and/or attached to almost any mounting accessory available.

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— Drones

Fleye could be your personal autonomous robot drone

The Fleye is claimed to be the world's safest drone. It may look like a flying soccer ball, but its shape is designed to keep all the moving parts well out of harm's way and make it a bit more resistant to crash damage. It's not just design that sets the Fleye apart though. A dual core Linux brain with an open SDK (software development kit) and API (application program interface) make this machine less like a conventional drone and more like a flying development platform.

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— Electronics

Multi-purpose Symbisa sensor looks to fast track the Internet of Things

Ceiling fans, thermostats, mailboxes and light fittings. It seems that no matter which direction you look in a smart home of the future you'll find a connected appliance interacting with its environment in one way or another. These smart devices generally feature hardware that's been carefully designed with a very specific purpose in mind, but what if there was more of a "one-size-fits-all" solution? British company Hanhaa is looking to offer inventors an easier route to the so-called Internet of Things, with a multi-purpose sensor kit that can be adapted to various tracking or monitoring applications within minutes of breaking open the box.

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— Around The Home

Smart lamp takes indoor lighting in a new direction

Most modern lighting operation is fairly straightforward – switches flip on/off, maybe even dim. More recently connected bulbs have offered the additional benefits of wireless settings, and some even double as speakers. Now directional control is being added to the smart lighting mix. The Fluxo smart lamp is designed to cast light, directly and/or indirectly, with simple finger swipes on a mobile device.

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— Computers

nOb offers precision control of virtually any onscreen element

The scroll wheel of a computer mouse can be a bit of an imprecise monster when it comes to making fine adjustments in media production software like video editing suites or digital audio workstations, leading to frustrating back and forth marathons or manual interventions to get onscreen elements to behave. The delightfully retro-looking nOb is kind of like a supercharged scroll wheel that's used for making ultra-fine adjustments of parameters, settings and screen elements.

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