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KAIST

TransWall displays interactive content on both of its faces

You've probably seen TV shows in which groups of characters – usually forensic investigators – view data on large transparent touchscreen displays. Well, researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have taken that concept a step further. Their TransWall is not only transparent, but it can also receive input and display content on either side of its screen, plus it's capable of haptic feedback.  Read More

A group of researchers has developed a pacemaker powered by an implantable flexible piezoe...

Over the past few decades, cardiac pacemaker technology has improved to the point that pacemakers have become a commonplace medical implant that have helped improve or save the lives of many millions of people around the world. Unfortunately, the battery technology used to power these devices has not kept pace and the batteries need to be replaced on average every seven years, which requires further surgery. To address this problem, a group of researchers from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has developed a cardiac pacemaker that is powered semi-permanently by harnessing energy from the body's own muscles.  Read More

KAIST's DCRS prototype turns a LED television on at a 5-meter distance (Photo: KAIST)

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), have developed a wireless charging system that can charge around 40 smart phones at a time, from a distance of 5 meters (16 ft). While we've examined numerous wireless charging systems, even one that transmits power to up to 9 m (30 ft), KAIST's prototype can power multiple devices within its range. It can deliver enough electrical juice, the scientists claim, to power many larger devices like fans, TVs and computers, simultaneously.  Read More

KAIST's device can generate electricity from bodily heat (Image: KAIST)

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have developed a lightweight, flexible and high-efficiency thermoelectric generator that can harness your body heat to generate a small amount of electricity. The device could be used to extend the battery life of low-power wearable devices.  Read More

One of KAIST's silver nanowire fingerprints

The counterfeiting of high-end products is a growing problem, and has led to the development of countermeasures such as invisible woven patterns, butterfly wing-inspired printing techniques, and even synthetic DNA. One of the drawbacks of some of these approaches, however, is the fact that implementing them can be quite a complex process. Now, a team from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has come up with something simpler – tiny jumbles of nanowires that form item-specific "fingerprints."  Read More

In basing the artificial neural network on the brain's central nervous system, the team sa...

It took a heavyweight like Google to bring the notion of head-mounted devices to the mainstream, but other developers are also testing the waters and pushing the boundaries of what's possible to achieve in the smart glasses space. Exhibit A is K-Glass, a wearable, hands-free display developed by researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST).  Read More

The Armadillo-T folds up to use less parking space

It’s time for the Hiriko and Casple-Podadera to fold themselves up and make room, as yet another folding electric car has been created. This one, known as the Armadillo-T, comes from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). As with the other two cars, it’s designed to "fold" (sort of) when not in use, in order to minimize the amount of parking space that it occupies.  Read More

One of Gumi's two new buses that will draw power from the road using the Online Electric V...

As of this Tuesday (August 6th) the South Korean city of Gumi’s transit system will see the addition of two electric buses that draw their power from the road. It’s the latest step in the development of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology's (KAIST's) Online Electric Vehicle (OLEV) system, in which electric cables embedded in the asphalt provide power to vehicles traveling on its surface.  Read More

The MagPen contains a magnet which is detected by the phone's existing magnetometers

The humble smartphone stylus may soon be gaining new features, thanks to a seemingly simple piece of technology. Developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) PhD student Sungjae Hwang, the MagPen is essentially just a plastic tube covered in conductive tape, with conductive rubber tips at either end and a coin-shaped magnet inserted half-way down its length. Via a custom app, however, magnetometers already present in the phone are able to determine where that magnet is in relation to the screen, and respond with a variety of drawing and writing functions.  Read More

A researcher manipulates DRC-HUBO's arms to demonstrate its compliant joints

The DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) has scheduled its first physical trial for late December, leaving competing teams less than six months to finish building and programming their robots. In case you're just tuning in, the DRC is a gauntlet of daunting tasks designed to test robots that may someday stand in for people as first responders. DARPA has just revealed the completed ATLAS humanoid, but there's still a half dozen others that remain somewhat mysterious. Now, Team DRC-HUBO is spilling the beans on its own humanoid robot.  Read More

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