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Jacket

The Funnell, by Restless Travellers (Photo: Restless Travellers)

It can be a hassle to carry around an umbrella or an extra coat all day just in case good weather turns to rain. Herein lies the appeal of the Funnell: a backpack that sports an integrated waterproof jacket that can be quickly accessed to keep you and your belongings dry.  Read More

SINTEF's jacket displays scrolling text messages on its sleeve

It's important for firefighters or members of disaster response crews to stay in touch with one another during operations, which is of course why they carry two-way radios. Researchers from Norway's SINTEF group, however, are developing a system that could help even more. It allows users to receive and read text messages hands-free, via their jackets.  Read More

Ducati's Multistrada D-Air, with wireless airbag jackets.

Ducati has announced a new version of its stunning Multistrada 1200 sports-tourer (check out our video review) that wirelessly inflates airbag jackets for both rider and passenger in the event of a crash. A step forward from the motorcycle airbag Honda showcased in its Goldwing series, the Ducati system can protect the rider and passenger even once they’ve separated from the bike.  Read More

The Diamond armor suit boasts level II bulletproof protection

If you're looking to extend your bulletproof wardrobe with something that won't be out of place alongside other garments, such as the Miguel Caballero bullet-proof polo shirt, the Bullet-Proof Gentleman’s Square and Garrison Bespoke's bulletproof three-piece suit, then the Diamond Armor could be a good fit. Developed by SuitArt, the Diamond Armor is a diamond-studded, bullet-proof, air-conditioned, bespoke-tailored suit costing US$3.2 million, making it the most expensive custom-tailored suit in the world.  Read More

Weatherall's focus lies in using standard data to provide a responsive and intuitive train...

The Glowfaster Jacket is a new take on fitness tracking wearables developed by ex-marine Simon Weatherall that provides runners with feedback on speed, heart rate and location by way of lights down its front and along the sleeves.  Read More

Joy Jackets were built as part of Cadbury's 'Joyville' campaign (Photo: Akio-Style)

One of the less practical examples of wearable technology we've seen of late is the "Joy Jacket" – a garment designed to convey a visual statement of happiness when the wearer consumes a certain chocolatier's product.  Read More

We take a look at a few gadgets and gizmos to help you through the cold winter months

Winter has officially set in across the Northern Hemisphere, bringing with it feet of snow and record-breaking low temperatures across the US. That doesn't mean that you have to pen yourself indoors for the entire season and pray for Punxsutawney Phil to go blind, however. We've got some of the latest winter gadgets and gizmos to help you brave the cold, frost and snow.  Read More

Esthete claims the LEDs can be seen from 100 m away

LED jackets built for cycling and running are nothing new. We've covered the Sporty Supaheroe jacket and other examples of this type of wearable technology. Where the new Eclaireur jacket steps it up is in integrating LEDs into a jacket you'll wear in public when you're not on your bike. On purpose.  Read More

Vamoose's jacket and poncho are designed to quickly fold into a 3-liter backpack

Designers seem to love convertible, multifunctional backpacks, as evidenced by designs like the Glyde Gear Fly and WalkBag. They don't mind the occasional convertible jacket, either - just look at the weird-but-real JakPak. The Vamoose jacket is both. Similar to the Xip3, the jacket transforms into a backpack when not needed for rain and cold.  Read More

The ColdWear demonstration sleeve

Working on arctic oil rigs and similar sites doesn't just mean putting on a jumper and a scarf. It’s arduous, exhausting and dangerous, and requires careful judgment at all times to deal with the hostile frozen environment. To make this a bit less hazardous, the Scandinavian research organization SINTEF is developing clothing equipped with sensors to monitor temperature and activity, with an eye on helping supervisors to determine when it's time for workers to stop work and return inside.  Read More

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