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Inkjet


— Medical

Silk-based functional inks put biosensor data on your fingertips

By - July 27, 2015 1 Picture

Although we've seen "bio-inks" that allow sensors to be drawn directly on a person's skin and other surfaces to gauge things like glucose levels, functional inks such as this are usually heat-sensitive, meaning they aren't suitable for use in inkjet printers. Researchers at Tufts University have now developed silk-based inks containing bacteria-sensing agents that can withstand the rigors of inkjet printing, opening the door much wider for printing biomolecules.

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— Science

Inkjet printers could produce paper sensors that identify dangerous food and water contaminants

By - April 9, 2015 2 Pictures
Sensors that identify infectious disease and food contaminants may soon be printed on paper using ordinary office inkjet printers. Researchers at McMaster University have developed a prototype that could lead to a commercial product in the next few years which helps doctors and scientists in the field quickly detect certain types of cancer or bacterial and respiratory infections or monitor toxin levels in water. Read More
— Electronics

Primera outs "world's smallest, lightest all-in-one printer"

By - January 8, 2015 10 Pictures
Unless you add "3D" to the mix, printers aren't often worth getting very excited about nowadays, but printer manufacturer Primera Technology has revealed what it reckons is the world's smallest and lightest all-in-one printer at this year's CES. The Primera Trio weighs 1.2 kg (2.7 lbs), is compared by the firm to the size of a hardcover book, and can run from an optional battery pack. Read More
— Medical

Prototype prints precise, patient-specific drug doses

By - May 19, 2014 1 Picture
It can be tricky to take exactly one fourths of a pill or the specific dose of prescribed medication, which is why researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to print the proper dosage that a patient requires. Their prototype uses inkjet printing technology and a predictive mathematical model that calculates exactly how much medicine the patients needs and prints out the precise doses into tablets or films. Read More
— Medical

Scientists run eye cells through an inkjet printer

By - December 19, 2013 1 Picture
Imagine if conditions that presently cause blindness could be treated by simply by fabricating new tissue, and using it to replace the defective part of the retina. We may not be at that point yet, but we've definitely taken a step closer, thanks to research being conducted at the University of Cambridge. Scientists there have successfully used an inkjet printer to "print" rats' retinal cells onto a substrate, paving the way for the creation of custom-made eye-repair material. Read More
— Computers

Clog-free inkjet printer nozzle inspired by the human eye

By - July 16, 2012 1 Picture
There was a time not so long ago that my inkjet printer saw a lot of action. Nowadays, however, it can sit idle for weeks or even months before being called into service. But when it is called upon, the long break between print jobs means the print heads are usually clogged and an ink-wasting head clean needs to be performed. Taking inspiration from the human eye, researchers at the University of Missouri (MU) have developed a print nozzle that prevents the ink inside from drying out when not in use. Read More
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