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Inkjet

Electronics

Disposable laser produced with inkjet printing tech

Most of the lasers used in items such as DVD players or optical mice are inorganic. They last much longer than organic lasers (which utilize carbon-based materials to amplify light), but they're also comparatively expensive and complex to make, plus their range of wavelengths is limited. Developing more durable organic lasers would be one way of addressing the situation, but a European research team has come up with another – just make them really cheap and easily-replaceable.Read More

Materials

Colorless ink produces multiple colors when printed

While most of us may not give much thought to the dyes used in color inks, they are in fact often quite toxic. That's why scientists at Russia's ITMO University have developed a more eco-friendly alternative – a non-toxic ink that produces different colors by altering the nanostructure of the material to which it's applied.Read More

Around The Home

Ripple Maker can put your face in your coffee

It's kinda nice when baristas draw little things like hearts or leaves in the foam on your cappuccino. There's a chance, however, that those designs may be going the way of cave paintings. That's because Israeli startup Steam CC recently introduced its Ripple Maker, a machine that reproduces photos, text or other graphics on coffee foam.Read More

Science

New process allows inkjet printers to produce rainbow holograms

Credit card and banknote-style security holograms are an effective form of anti-counterfeiting technology, as they're very difficult to replicate. Every time a new batch is made, however, a "master hologram" has to be created first, to act as a template. These masters can take days to produce, using complex, expensive equipment. That could be about to change, however, as scientists at Russia's ITMO University have developed a quick-and-easy hologram production method that utilizes a regular inkjet printer.Read More

Medical

Silk-based functional inks put biosensor data on your fingertips

Although we've seen "bio-inks" that allow sensors to be drawn directly on a person's skin and other surfaces to gauge things like glucose levels, functional inks such as this are usually heat-sensitive, meaning they aren't suitable for use in inkjet printers. Researchers at Tufts University have now developed silk-based inks containing bacteria-sensing agents that can withstand the rigors of inkjet printing, opening the door much wider for printing biomolecules.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Inkjet printers could produce paper sensors that identify dangerous food and water contaminants

Sensors that identify infectious disease and food contaminants may soon be printed on paper using ordinary office inkjet printers. Researchers at McMaster University have developed a prototype that could lead to a commercial product in the next few years which helps doctors and scientists in the field quickly detect certain types of cancer or bacterial and respiratory infections or monitor toxin levels in water.Read More

Electronics

Primera outs "world's smallest, lightest all-in-one printer"

Unless you add "3D" to the mix, printers aren't often worth getting very excited about nowadays, but printer manufacturer Primera Technology has revealed what it reckons is the world's smallest and lightest all-in-one printer at this year's CES. The Primera Trio weighs 1.2 kg (2.7 lbs), is compared by the firm to the size of a hardcover book, and can run from an optional battery pack. Read More

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