Photokina 2014 highlights

Imaging

An artist's impression of how the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation lidar will revea...

NASA is developing a laser-based instrument for deployment on the International Space Station that will probe the depths of Earth's forests from space in a bid to reveal more about their role in the planet's carbon cycle. After its completion in 2018, this Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) lidar will join the likes of the Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite in studying Earth's vegetation on a global scale.  Read More

Researchers at Rice University have developed an image sensor that integrates light amplif...

Researchers at Rice University's Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP) have developed a new image sensor that mimics the way we see color by integrating light amplifiers and color filters directly onto the pixels. The new design enables smaller, less complex, and more organic designs for CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors and other photodetectors used in cameras.  Read More

Two collaborating Japanese universities have laid claim to creating the world’s fastest ca...

At a mind-boggling 4.4 trillion frames per second (FPS), the new STAMP (Sequentially Timed All-optical Mapping Photography) system developed by two Japanese universities is claimed to be the world’s fastest camera. Taking pictures at a resolution of 450 x 450 pixels, the new image-capturing device is purported to be so fast that it can be used to photograph the conduction of heat, which travels at a speed equivalent to one-sixth the velocity of light.  Read More

Robots created at the University of California are able to look through solid walls using ...

Robots created by a team working at the University of California, Santa Barbara are able to look through solid walls using just Wi-Fi signals. With potential applications in search and rescue, surveillance, detection and archeology, these robots have the capability to identify the position and outline of unseen objects within a scanned structure, and then categorize their composition as metal, timber, or flesh.  Read More

A lab mouse body, one week after after the start of the PARS process – the arrow in the mi...

Ordinarily, when scientists want to see specific cells within a piece of biological tissue, they first have to remove that tissue from the body, slice it very thin, then examine those two-dimensional slices using a microscope. Imagine, though, if the tissue could be made transparent – seeing tagged cells within it would be sort of like looking at three-dimensional bubbles inside an ice cube. Well, that's just what a team at Caltech have done using a technique known as PARS, or perfusion-assisted agent release in situ.  Read More

The camera uses diffused light instead of mirrors to see around corners

Peeking around a corner has long been a staple of spy films and TV, from Get Smart to 007. Researchers at the University of Bonn in Germany and the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada have found a better way than poking a makeup mirror about, however: a camera system that can reconstruct the shape of objects using diffusely scattered laser light.  Read More

Four new images have been released to mark the 15th anniversary of the launch of the Chand...

Today is the 15th anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra is one of NASA's "Great Observatories," along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope. Since its launch, its x-ray vision and high sensitivity have helped us to better understand the universe.  Read More

A mouse's small intestine, as made visible using nanojuice

When someone suffers from a gastrointestinal disorder such as celiac disease, Crohn's disease or irritable bowel syndrome, it's standard practice for doctors to take a look at the state of their small intestine. This is typically done by having them drink a rather unpleasant-tasting barium solution, and then submitting to x-rays, an MRI or ultrasound. According to scientists at New York's University at Buffalo, however, all of those imaging techniques have serious shortcomings. Their proposed solution? A stiff drink of nanojuice.  Read More

This infrared image, one of the first taken by SPHERE, displays a dust ring orbiting a nea...

A new scientific instrument for detecting and observing remote exoplanets has been successfully installed on Unit 3 of the ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch instrument, or SPHERE, recently returned its first set of images and is promised to revolutionize the exploration and study of these distant celestial bodies.  Read More

Artist's impression of Sentinel-1A in low-Earth orbit (Image: ESA/ATG medialab)

Despite being in orbit for less than two months, the ESA's Sentinel-1A satellite is already showing its worth in the humanitarian sphere by aiding with relief efforts in the Balkans, where flood waters are estimated to have killed dozens, leaving thousands more displaced.  Read More

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