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Hydrogen


— Automotive

Aston Martin to race Hybrid Hydrogen Rapide S about the Nurburgring

By - April 13, 2013 6 Pictures
Set to celebrate its hundredth birthday this year, Aston Martin decided an evolutionary statement was in order. So what does one of the world's most iconic performance houses bring to the party to celebrate the start of year 101? How about the brilliant 4-door Rapide, powered by a 6.0 liter V12, with hydrogen option? Then, how about entering it in the 24 Hours of Nurburgring and call it the Hyrbrid Hydrogen Rapide S? Read More
— Environment

Self-healing “artificial leaf” produces energy from dirty water

By - April 10, 2013 1 Picture
Back in 2011, scientists reported the creation of the “world’s first practical artificial leaf” that mimics the ability of real leaves to produce energy from sunlight and water. Touted as a potentially inexpensive source of electricity for those in developing countries and remote areas, the leaf’s creators have now given it a capability that would be especially beneficial in such environments – the ability to self heal and therefore produce energy from dirty water. Read More
— Science

Multi-use Titanium Dioxide claimed to be the next "wonder material"

By - March 21, 2013 2 Pictures
Graphene could soon be facing some competition for the unofficial title of “World’s Most Useful New Substance.” Led by Associate Professor Darren Sun, a team of scientists at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University have spent the past five years developing a material known as Multi-use Titanium Dioxide. Their research indicates that it can be used to produce hydrogen and clean water from wastewater, double the lifespan of batteries, create antibacterial wound dressings ... and more. Read More
— Science

Silicon nanoparticles could lead to on-demand hydrogen generation

By - January 23, 2013 4 Pictures
Researchers at the University of Buffalo have created spherical silicon nanoparticles they claim could lead to hydrogen generation on demand becoming a “just add water” affair. When the particles are combined with water, they rapidly form hydrogen and silicic acid, a nontoxic byproduct, in a reaction that requires no light, heat or electricity. In experiments, the hydrogen produced was shown to be relatively pure by successfully being used to power a small fan via a small fuel cell. Read More
— Science

Inexpensive catalyst for producing hydrogen under real-world conditions found

By - January 11, 2013 1 Picture
Hydrogen has been hailed as the fuel of the future, but producing it cleanly using platinum as a catalyst is simply too costly to service the world's energy needs. On the flipside, producing hydrogen with fossil fuels not only releases CO2 as a byproduct, but is unsustainable, negating hydrogen's green potential. However, hydrogen may yet make good on its promise thanks to a group of scientists at the University of Cambridge. Read More
— Environment

GE unveils Durathon battery for zero-emission buses

By - December 21, 2012 2 Pictures
General Electric’s research team has unveiled its new Durathon battery, which the company says makes it cheaper to power buses using clean energy. It is used in tandem with a lithium battery and a hydrogen fuel cell, a combination that the researchers say makes it possible for the vehicle to achieve full performance with a much smaller fuel cell than previously possible. Read More
— Environment

Australian researchers develop promising new approach to hydrogen storage

By - December 5, 2012 3 Pictures
Scientists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Australia, are developing a novel way to store hydrogen that could help turn it into a viable portable fuel source. The research centers on using synthesized nanoparticles of the compound sodium borohydride (NaBH4 for those who love chemistry), which when encased inside nickel shells exhibits surprising and practical storage properties including the ability to reabsorb hydrogen and release it at much lower temperatures than previously observed, making it an attractive proposition for transport applications. Read More
— Science

Researchers produce hydrogen from sunlight, water and rust

By - November 12, 2012 4 Pictures
As scientists endeavor to increase the efficiency of solar panels, the challenge of storing the resultant energy cheaply and in an environmentally responsible way must also be met. To this end, researchers at Switzerland’s École polytechnique fédérale de Lausann (EPFL) have developed an inexpensive device that transforms light energy into hydrogen, for storage and later use. The new prototype makes use of sunlight, water, and metal oxides, including iron oxide – or rust. Read More
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