Advertisement
more top stories »

HTML5


— Robotics

Spanish start-up launches low-cost hackable robot

Spanish start-up Aisoy Robotics is marketing a new robot that, while it may look similar to the famous Furby, is actually a fully programmable research and development platform. The Aisoy1 II robot comes with a variety of sensors (touch, light, position, temperature, and camera), microphone and speaker, a 70 mini-LED matrix display (for animated lips) and includes a dialogue system for speech recognition and synthesis, as well as computer vision software for face and object recognition, all running on the Linux operating system. Read More
— Games

Atari Arcade brings classic games to the Web with HTML5

This year marks the 40th anniversary of Atari releasing its first arcade game. The name of that game was Pong, and although the gameplay consisted of nothing more than two paddles moved up and down to deflect a ball to the other side of the screen, it heralded the beginnings of a huge mainstream industry. What better way to celebrate that anniversary and the birth of the modern video game industry than by playing some Pong - and Missile Command, Centipede, and others - directly in your web browser thanks to Atari. With a little help from Microsoft. Read More
— Science

New Google service lets users "zoom" through years of time-lapse satellite photos

A combined effort between researchers at the Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Institute, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Google provides users with easy access to 13 years of NASA Landsat imagery of the Earth’s surface. The new capability within Google Earth Engine lets users zoom in and out on any spot on the globe, moving back and forth in time between 1999 and 2011. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Adobe finally delivers Flash video to iOS devices

In April 2010, Steve Jobs’ outlined why Flash would not be permitted on iOS devices in his “Thoughts on Flash” open letter. While Jobs made some valid points in terms of Flash’s proprietary nature, security concerns, and the fact it drains the batteries of mobile devices, the popularity of the Skyfire 2.0 mobile web browser and standalone VideoQ Flash video player showed that there were still plenty of iOS users keen to Flash video on their mobile devices. Now Adobe has finally come to the party with its own solution that will allow Flash video content to be viewed directly within Safari on iOS devices. Because Adobe will use a similar technique to that of Skyfire, users of Android and Playbook mobile devices will also benefit in terms of battery life. Read More
— Games

Play id's classic Doom in your web browser

I'd forgive you for thinking that a 1993-era first-person shooter running in a web browser is not particularly worthy of Gizmag's attention, with the browser-based Quake Arena having been online since 2009. What makes this noteworthy is that while Quake Arena runs as compiled x86 code and a browser plugin, this Doom port relies solely on web standards like HTML5's Canvas element and Javascript. That sound you hear is an infinite number of high-school IT teachers groaning. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement