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History

Marine

Underwater robot finds "Nessie"

The good news: The Loch Ness Monster has been captured on sonar by an underwater robot operated by the British division of Norway's Kongsberg Maritime. The bad news: "Nessie" is a prop from a Sherlock Holmes film that sank in the loch in 1969. The monstrous model was long thought lost until it was discovered this week by the Munin Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) as part of an underwater survey of the loch for The Loch Ness Project and VisitScotland.Read More

Laptops Feature

The laptop turns 35

April 3, 1981 marked the introduction of the Osborne 1, the first mainstream portable computer. Three-and-a-half decades later, laptops are now much more portable – but how do they compare to the deeper vision that sparked them, and what lays ahead? Gizmag talks with Dr. Alan Kay, the personal computing visionary who came up with the notion of a notebook computer, and Lee Felsenstein, designer of the first commercially successful forerunner to the laptop, to get their views.Read More

Computers

Britain's first mass produced computer goes on public display

A pioneering piece of first-generation computer hardware was re-introduced to the public today. Almost 63 years after it made its debut at a trade show, the prototype of Britain's first mass-produced business computer is now on display at The National Museum of Computing (TNMOC) at Bletchley Park in Milton Keynes, about 50 miles north of London. The Hollerith Electronic Computer (HEC-1) was Britain's most commercially successful early computer and the first to be installed in many countries, such as India, New Zealand, and those in East Africa.Read More

Science

Shakespeare’s missing skull – the tech behind the investigation

You've probably already heard that a recent investigation into Shakespeare's tomb for a documentary on the UK's Channel 4 revealed that the bard's skull has likely been removed from his tomb. What you may not know, however, is exactly how that was determined. We caught up with one of the researchers to find out more about grave-glimpsing with ground-penetrating radar.Read More

Bicycles

In Pictures: Cycle Revolution at the Design Museum London

It seemed only fitting to arrive at an exhibition about all things cycling on two wheels. As such, we recently rolled up at the Design Museum in London on a rental bike, before venturing inside to look at the assembled bike porn which is the Cycle Revolution exhibition. Here's our pick of the most interesting items on show, including iconic machines ridden by sporting heroes, and some decidedly more out-there cycles.Read More

Space

NASA declassifies Apollo 10 "space music" ... in 1973

NASA recently released evidence buried for decades showing that astronauts on the Apollo 10 lunar mission in 1969 heard strange "space music" that seemingly defies explanation – or did it ... and does it? Many news services have picked up on the story and claim that the "space music" incident is only now being made public, but NASA disagrees. According to the space agency, the audio and transcripts from the mission have been available in the National Archives since 1973 and the explanation of the event is quite down to Earth.Read More

Do not open until 2957: MIT uncovers time capsule

A time capsule that's not to be opened until the year 2957 has been recovered on the MIT campus. Discovered by workers building the new MIT.nano building, it contains a letter to the people of the next millennium and historical artifacts, including an experimental electronic component that once gave the transistor a run for its money.Read More

Computers

"World's first personal computer" sells for €34,000

One of only ten surviving Kenbak-1 personal computers from 1971 has sold at auction for €34,000 (US$36,500). Judged the "first commercially available personal computer" in 1987 by a panel at the Boston Computer Museum that included Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, it's a fascinating piece of history that sheds a light on the chaotic early days of the desktop computer.Read More

Collectibles

First digital computer installed on a manned spacecraft goes to auction

A Space Age collectible that not only represents a first in space, but also a first in computer history is on the auction block in Dallas, Texas. As part of its Space Exploration Signature Auction, Heritage Auctions is taking bids for a vintage random access, non-destructive readout 4,096 bit memory plane that flew on Gemini 3. This ferric memory unit was an integral part of the Gemini Spacecraft Computer, which was the first computer installed in a manned space capsule.Read More

Collectibles

Apollo 15 watch sells for US$1.6 million

A unique relic of the Space Age went on the auction block at RR Auction this week with the Bulova wristwatch worn on the Moon in 1971 by Colonel David Scott as Commander of Apollo 15 sold for US$1,625,000. The Bulova Wrist Chronograph was carried on the mission's third surface EVA as a backup timepiece to the NASA-issue Omega watch worn on US manned missions. The personal property of Scott, it is the only watch to return from the Moon to remain in private hands.Read More

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