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History

Inventors & Remarkable People Feature

The stopwatch: 200 years old and still ticking

Time stopped 200 years ago … then it was restarted, stopped again, and reset. No, this isn't some obscure retrospective application of relativity, we're talking about the invention of the stopwatch. In 1816 Louis Monet created a device known as the compteur de tierces – a fascinating tale in itself that only came to light a few years ago – and the era in which intervals of time could be accurately measured began. The advent of these little second counters has not only had a profound impact on our daily lives, but changed our very definition of time. Let's take a look back at how it all started.Read More

Science

King Tut's dagger was out of this world

Scientists have long debated the origins of the iron in a dagger blade belonging to King Tutankhamun that was discovered 91 years ago. New evidence, obtained through the use of highly-accurate X-ray technology, should end the discussion, revealing that the metal in the famous dagger made its way to Earth as part of an ancient meteorite.Read More

Space Feature

Leap into the lunar unknown: Fifty years since the landmark launch of Surveyor 1

Space travel can still be dramatic in 2016, but it's a cakewalk compared to half a century ago. Today marks 50 years since the unmanned Surveyor I probe lifted off from Cape Canaveral, and when it landed in the Oceanus Procellarum on June 2, 1966, it was more than the first US soft landing on the Moon, it was a leap into the unknown. Launched at the height of the Space Race and the depth of the Cold War, the stakes for the first of seven Surveyor missions were incredibly high, as NASA wrestled with untried technologies and questions about the basic nature of the Moon that could make or break any hope of a manned landing.Read More

Marine

Underwater robot finds "Nessie"

The good news: The Loch Ness Monster has been captured on sonar by an underwater robot operated by the British division of Norway's Kongsberg Maritime. The bad news: "Nessie" is a prop from a Sherlock Holmes film that sank in the loch in 1969. The monstrous model was long thought lost until it was discovered this week by the Munin Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) as part of an underwater survey of the loch for The Loch Ness Project and VisitScotland.Read More

Laptops Feature

The laptop turns 35

April 3, 1981 marked the introduction of the Osborne 1, the first mainstream portable computer. Three-and-a-half decades later, laptops are now much more portable – but how do they compare to the deeper vision that sparked them, and what lays ahead? Gizmag talks with Dr. Alan Kay, the personal computing visionary who came up with the notion of a notebook computer, and Lee Felsenstein, designer of the first commercially successful forerunner to the laptop, to get their views.Read More

Computers

Britain's first mass produced computer goes on public display

A pioneering piece of first-generation computer hardware was re-introduced to the public today. Almost 63 years after it made its debut at a trade show, the prototype of Britain's first mass-produced business computer is now on display at The National Museum of Computing (TNMOC) at Bletchley Park in Milton Keynes, about 50 miles north of London. The Hollerith Electronic Computer (HEC-1) was Britain's most commercially successful early computer and the first to be installed in many countries, such as India, New Zealand, and those in East Africa.Read More

Science

Shakespeare’s missing skull – the tech behind the investigation

You've probably already heard that a recent investigation into Shakespeare's tomb for a documentary on the UK's Channel 4 revealed that the bard's skull has likely been removed from his tomb. What you may not know, however, is exactly how that was determined. We caught up with one of the researchers to find out more about grave-glimpsing with ground-penetrating radar.Read More

Bicycles

In Pictures: Cycle Revolution at the Design Museum London

It seemed only fitting to arrive at an exhibition about all things cycling on two wheels. As such, we recently rolled up at the Design Museum in London on a rental bike, before venturing inside to look at the assembled bike porn which is the Cycle Revolution exhibition. Here's our pick of the most interesting items on show, including iconic machines ridden by sporting heroes, and some decidedly more out-there cycles.Read More

Space

NASA declassifies Apollo 10 "space music" ... in 1973

NASA recently released evidence buried for decades showing that astronauts on the Apollo 10 lunar mission in 1969 heard strange "space music" that seemingly defies explanation – or did it ... and does it? Many news services have picked up on the story and claim that the "space music" incident is only now being made public, but NASA disagrees. According to the space agency, the audio and transcripts from the mission have been available in the National Archives since 1973 and the explanation of the event is quite down to Earth.Read More

Do not open until 2957: MIT uncovers time capsule

A time capsule that's not to be opened until the year 2957 has been recovered on the MIT campus. Discovered by workers building the new MIT.nano building, it contains a letter to the people of the next millennium and historical artifacts, including an experimental electronic component that once gave the transistor a run for its money.Read More

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