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Helmets


— Sports

Football helmet flexes like a car bumper to absorb impacts

A collaboration between the University of Washington and helmet manufacturer VICIS has led to the development of the Zero1, a football helmet designed to absorb impact more effectively than designs currently in use. Featuring an outer shell that yields upon impact like a car bumper, the Zero1 helmet is expected to be available to select NFL and NCAA football teams this spring and be worn in the 2016-17 season.

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— Motorcycles

Fusar Mohawk adds camera, comms, route logging and more to existing helmets

Touted by its creators as the most advanced helmet-mounted accessory ever, the Fusar Mohawk is designed to make any helmet smarter, safer and more social. With the inclusion of a 12-MP camera, accelerometer, magnetometer, gyroscope, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0, and GPS, as well as a PTT coms system and connected mobile apps, the unit is intended to replace a host of helmet-mountable devices.

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— Bicycles

Latest folding bicycle helmet is a real Headkayse

One of the main reasons that many cyclists give for not wearing a helmet is the fact that helmets take up so much room when they're being carried in a bag. As a result, we've seen a number of companies developing folding helmets. One of the latest, UK-based Headkayse, claims that its helmet not only folds down small, but that it's also more comfortable and perhaps even safer than a regular helmet.

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— Health & Wellbeing

Helmet decal could reduce athletes' brain injuries

If we lived in a world where athletes only received straight-on blows to the head, then regular helmets would offer all the protection needed. In real life, however, helmets usually receive impacts at an angle, with the resulting twisting of the head potentially causing brain injuries to the wearer. Now, scientists from Vancouver's Simon Fraser University have developed something to help keep that from happening – a sticker called the BrainShield.

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— Materials

Color-changing polymer to indicate severity of hits to the head

A head trauma can be difficult to diagnose and destroy a life years after the event. Being able to tell immediately if the force someone has suffered is sufficient to result in a traumatic brain injury can make all the difference in limiting the damage. A team from the University of Pennsylvania has developed a material that could one day be incorporated into headgear to instantly gauge the severity of blows and provide a clearly visible indication of injury.

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