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Health

New research shows that exposure to silicon-based nanoparticles may negatively influence c...

Due to its huge potential in applications ranging from cheaper vaccinations to energy-storing car panels, there's plenty of excitement surrounding the emergence of nanotechnology. But a team of scientists are urging caution, with a study conducted at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology suggesting that exposure to silicon-based nanoparticles may play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.  Read More

One day virtual reality and exercise bikes could team up to spice up your workout (Origina...

VR headsets like the Oculus Rift and Gear VR are great for gaming and immersive 360-degree videos. But what about exercise? Though the idea isn't without its flaws, virtual reality could one day add an exciting new dimension to stationary workout machines. Gizmag chatted with a researcher in the field (and went for a mind-bending VR spin of our own) to investigate.  Read More

The PLAC Test for Lp-PLA2 screens for cardiovascular inflammation which can lead to a buil...

Coronary heart disease (CHD) kills more than 385,000 people in the United States each year, and more than half of those who die suddenly have no previous symptoms. A new blood test that could reduce CHD-related illness and mortality by predicting the risk of future heart disease has been cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The PLAC Test for Lp-PLA2 screens for cardiovascular inflammation which can lead to a build up of rupture-prone plaque and result in a heart attack or stroke.  Read More

The Johns Hopkins Ebola suit is color coded to show what surfaces are safe to touch when r...

For doctors, nurses, soldiers, and other responders fighting the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, currently available protective suits are both too hot to wear in the tropics and often a source of contagion when they're being taken off. To make moving and treating patients safer, Johns Hopkins University, along with international health affiliate Jhpiego and other partners, is developing a new anti-contamination suit for health care workers that is both cooler to wear and easier to remove.  Read More

The End of Sitting is currently installed at Amsterdam's Looiersgracht 60 Gallery (Photo: ...

Dutch firm RAAAF and visual artist Barbara Visser recently collaborated on a futuristic project appropriately titled The End of Sitting that challenges preconceptions of what an office workspace actually is.  Read More

The Photon Space is a glass building designed to improve our health by maximizing exposure...

Our increasing understanding of circadian rhythms is changing how we think about the spaces we inhabit. Lighting, for example, can now be adjusted to alter mood and sleep patterns. A new building called The Photon Space, however, will take a more natural approach to help residents get in the (circadian) rhythm, being made almost entirely of glass.  Read More

Varidesk Pro Plus - halfway up

Sitting down all day is bad for you. Standing up all day is bad for you. We do so many standing desk stories here at Gizmag that we've become acutely aware of our unhealthy desking habits – and just how expensive a lot of sit/stand desks tend to be. So when we ran across the Varidesk Pro Plus, which sells for US$350, fits two monitors and goes up and down with spring-loaded ease, we picked up half a dozen. Here's how they're going.  Read More

The MisterBrightLight standing desk prompts users to get to their feet when they've been s...

We've kept a pretty keen eye on the standing desk movement here at Gizmag. After all, us writers can spend fair chunks of time on our backsides. The team behind MisterBrightLight is the latest to take a stand on the stubborn nature of standard office furniture, launching a smart desk whose height can be adjusted by hand gestures when you've been seated for too long.  Read More

Seema Tiwari-Woodruff, associate professor of biomedical sciences at the UC Riverside Scho...

Researchers are zeroing in on what looks like an effective treatment for the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis. Teams from UC Riverside and New York's Rockefeller University have both used the same compound, indazole chloride, to successfully reverse the progression of MS in mice. The drug appears to be able to stimulate the regeneration of the myelin sheath – the nerve pathway coating that is progressively destroyed as MS attacks the nervous system.  Read More

The cat and mouse Pac-Man-style game found to help treat lazy eye

With video games having previously been found to improve decision making speeds and the brain's capacity to learn, scientists have now created challenging computer games with a fun element that significantly improved depth perception and binocular vision in people with a lazy eye. Unlike the traditional patch used to treat the condition, the video games encourage both eyes to work together.  Read More

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