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Hair

— Health & Wellbeing

High-tech comb uses plasma to kill lice

As some parents will already know, head lice infestations can be very difficult to treat. Typically a toxic shampoo or lotion has to first be applied to the sufferer's scalp, after which the lice are removed by pulling a specialized comb through their hair. Louse eggs aren't harmed by such shampoos, however, so the treatment needs to be repeated once they've hatched. This means more nasty chemicals, and more discomfort for the child (or adult). That's why researchers at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films have developed an alternative, in the form of a comb that zaps the pests with cold plasma.

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— 3D Printing

Scientists use 3D printer to create synthetic hair

You know how when you're using a hot glue gun, and you get all those little strands of glue forming when you pull the gun back from the surface being glued? Well, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used that same principle to create 3D-printed "hair." The discovery could allow for the creation of 3D-printed devices containing brushes or bristles … or even for making troll dolls.

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— Health & Wellbeing

FDA-approved drugs show promise for rapid and robust hair regrowth

Other than costly transplants, underperforming creams and less-than-convincing wigs and combovers, those experiencing hair loss aren't exactly spoilt for choice when it comes to addressing fading follicles. Over the years science has teased us with a number of promising developments, but none have yet evolved into market-ready saviours the bare-bonced among us are waiting for. New research suggests that a solution be on the horizon, however, with scientists discovering that blocking certain enzyme activity can treat certain kinds of hair loss, with bald mice treated in this way sprouting new hair within 10 days.

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— Health & Wellbeing

Stem cell-based treatment for baldness a step closer

As one of the follically-challenged, any new breakthroughs in the area of hair regeneration will generally get my attention. When stem cells first started to gain widespread media attention I, no doubt like many others, thought a full head of hair was just around the corner. But despite numerous developments, years later my dome is still of the chrome variety. Providing the latest cause for cautious optimism, researchers have now developed a way to generate a large number number of hair-follicle-generating stem cells from adult cells. Read More
— Wearables

SmartWig: Sony wants to sweep wearable electronics under the rug

Sony may be looking to take the relatively new field of wearable electronics in a slightly unexpected direction if a patent filed by the company is any indication. The patent isn't for a competing version of Google Glasses, nor on a watch so smart that it could join Mensa, but on the SmartWig. Scratching your head yet? Before you pull the rug out from under this concept, some of the possible applications are more useful than one might expect from a hi-tech hairpiece. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Potential baldness treatment grows new hair using patient's own cells

Current hair transplantation techniques essentially rob Peter to pay Paul, redistributing hair, usually from the back of the head, to the balding area. However, according to Angela M. Christiano from Columbia University Medical Center, about 90 percent of women with hair loss are not strong candidates for hair transplantation surgery because of insufficient donor hair. A new technique developed by Dr Christiano and colleagues that generates new human hair growth from a patient's own cells could make transplantation feasible for such women, as well as men in the early stages of baldness. Read More

Single Handed Barber promises an easier DIY do

Clipping your own hair can involve some complicated acrobatics and multiple mirror arrangements with no guarantee of satisfactory results. A buzz cut might seem pretty simple to pull off on your own, but unless you have rubber arms, it can be mission impossible to get it done evenly all over the head. The Single Handed Barber promises to make a trim a simple one-person affair. Read More
— Games

AMD's TressFX Hair gives game characters lovely locks

The problems associated with rendering realistic hair has held video games back for years. When Nintendo first created the sprite for Mario in the original Donkey Kong, it gave him a hat because it was too difficult to animate his hair. When video games made the leap into the world of real-time 3D graphics, things didn't get much better. Today AMD is officially unveiling its solution, TressFX Hair, that will significantly improve the look of virtual hair beginning with the new Tomb Raider. Read More
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