Computational creativity and the future of AI

Gesture Control

Opho's Keys keyboard takes the Guitar Hero approach to learning a musical instrument

There's something pretty fulfilling about nailing those floating, colorful notes in Guitar Hero, a feeling that a company named Incident adapted to a more lifelike guitar in 2012 to pretty good effect. The firm has rebranded itself as Opho and is now singing a slightly different tune, launching a LED-lit keyboard based on the same, super-addictive learning principle.  Read More

Gizmag fires up some of the wackiest, most niche or not-ready-for-primetime wearables we r...

The wearables trend was on full display at CES 2015 in Las Vegas earlier this month, where we spotted lots of new wearables, including many that we'd be shocked to ever see in the wild.  Read More

The G Flex 2 has a 5.5-inch display (Photo: Eric mack/Gizmag)

The first new smartphone unveiled at CES 2015 is a follow-up to the LG G Flex, which was on display here in Las Vegas at CES 2014 a year ago. The LG G Flex 2 brings back the curved, (slightly) flexible form factor of the original, but gives a major boost to its hardware and software.  Read More

Onecue allows users to control a variety of home devices with simple hand gestures

One problem with the number of living room gadgets available now is the number of remote controls that we need to use them. A new device from eyeSight seeks to remedy this issue by turning the user into a universal controller. Onecue allows users to control a host of devices via hand gestures.  Read More

The Mind4 drone takes a different approach to tracking athletes from above

Among the swarm of consumer drones to emerge this year, a number have been aimed squarely at action sports devotees. What defines these vehicles is a tracking feature that enables the drone to autonomously follow athletes from above, but these generally require the user to carry a smartphone to communicate their GPS position. Streaming from a built-in camera to a smartphone app, the Mind4 drone instead allows users to select any object to follow onscreen, a feature that could lead to new possibilities in aerial drone photography.  Read More

Sesame aims to provide smartphone access to users with disabilities that prevent them from...

Sesame is a system designed specifically for users with only limited or no use of their hands. The device pairs head tracking software with some familiar hardware with the goal of bringing smartphone functionality to those who would otherwise be unable to make use of it.  Read More

Drive responds to the user's finger movements, but only if their hands are where they shou...

When it comes to safe driving tips, taking your hands off the steering wheel to make or receive calls doesn't rate way up there. Many people instead use hands-free voice prompt systems, although these can also be be distracting, as they require users to think of the correct prompts and then speak them very clearly. Drive offers an alternative – it's a device that's controlled using finger movements, and it won't work unless the user's hands are on the wheel.  Read More

The Dexmo Classic (left) and F2

What happens when you're immersed in a virtual world – such as a game – and you want to use your real-world fingers to control your virtual fingers in that world? Well, we've already seen a number of sensor-equipped gloves, but China's Dexta Robotics is taking what it claims is a more cost-effective approach. Its Dexmo is an exoskeleton for your hand, which can even provide the user with a limited sense of touch.  Read More

Researchers have developed an app that lets gesture controls be used on existing mobile de...

While touch screens have enabled smartphone manufacturers to increase screen real estate by ditching physical keyboards and other buttons, they do have a downside, with fingers often obscuring the display. Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new app that overcomes this problem by bringing gesture control to mobile devices using their existing built-in camera.  Read More

The Leia Display System (LDS) projects images onto an interactive mist, which can then be ...

The recently-unveiled Leia Display System (LDS) is a lot like a large touchscreen – but with one important difference: its screen is not solid, but rather made from mist. This means you can walk right through the screen, manipulate displayed images using hand gestures reminiscent of Minority Report, or even interact with the display using your whole body.  Read More

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