Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

GE

Green Bean connects to GE appliances

What if your dryer could send a notification that would buzz your phone or smartwatch to let you know your laundry is done? Well, it may be easier to tap into the brains of your appliances than you might think, with the US$20 open-source Green Bean module announced today by GE at MakerCon in New York.  Read More

Rendering of the GE9X fan using a new fourth-generation composite

GE is looking to a new generation of carbon-fiber composites to make the fan blades for its GE9X jet engine. That engine is being developed for the Boeing 777X passenger airplanes that are set to enter service in 2020 and the new blades promise to provide larger, lighter engines with greater fuel efficiency.  Read More

A mock-up of the universal calorie counting device

Although there are already devices that can tell you approximately how many calories are in your food, they typically require you to manually input data regarding the type and amount of food that you're eating ... and as we all know, people generally don't like having to "do" things. A senior scientist at GE, however, is developing a gadget that could instantly display the caloric content of any food placed within it, at the touch of a button.  Read More

The Refuel is a smart tank gauge designed to ensure your tank is ready when you need it

The partnership between Quirky and GE continues to bear fruit following the release of various smart products designed to work in conjunction with the Wink app. Joining the family is Refuel, a smart propane gas gauge designed to ensure your barbeque guests aren't dished up a plate of salad and raw meat after your grill runs out of gas.  Read More

GE is entering the smart bulb market with Link bulbs starting at around US$15

Having connected devices in the home is quickly becoming more and more popular. One device that's leading the charge is the light bulb, with products like the Lumen Smart Bulb and LIFX LED light bulbs feature connected coolness. Now, GE is entering the space, as the company has just announced Link, a connected LED bulb with a fairly reasonable price tag.  Read More

The first production HondaJet made its first flight at the company's world headquarters in...

Honda Aircraft Company has announced that its first production HondaJet has taken to the skies. The flight, which took place at HondaJet’s headquarters at Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina, moves the executive jet aircraft closer to certification ahead of a planned entry into service next year.  Read More

GE Honda Aero Engines has shipped the first pair of production HF120 jet engines for the H...

The Hondajet has passed another milestone on its way to entering commercial service. After completing FAA certification testing last year, the executive jet's first pair of production HF120 jet engines have been shipped.  Read More

GE has found a way to extend wind turbine rotor blades without replacing them

Sometimes progress can be its own worst enemy, with early adopters being stuck with obsolete equipment that leaves them with the choice of living with out-dated technology or an expensive replacement. The green energy field isn’t immune to this, and as part of a US$2 million renewable energy project, GE has developed a way to make smaller, less efficient wind turbines into bigger more efficient ones with a bit of plastic (or carbon composite) surgery.  Read More

The Aros air conditioner works with the WINK app

Air conditioners are a blessing in a hot climate, but with their thermostat minds they’re almost like sticking a vacuum cleaner in your wallet. To help remedy this, GE and Quirky have launched the Aros smart air conditioner; the first major connected appliance of the partnership. This Wi-Fi-enabled air conditioning unit uses Quirky’s WINK app to learn its owner’s habits and adjust itself accordingly, so it keeps the home cool without breaking the bank.  Read More

Artist's impression of the undersea pipline X-ray in operation (Image: GE)

Using X-rays and other forms of radiation has been a standard tool for testing pipelines for decades, but until now it's been largely confined to factories and land-based pipelines instead of the deep seabed. That’s changing as GE adapts its medical X-ray systems to work in the crushing pressures of the deep oceans, as part of a remote-controlled submersible rig for examining pipelines in place.  Read More

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