Advertisement
more top stories »

Furniture


— Around The Home

StandDesk lets you choose to remain sitting or try standing

As we have recently witnessed here on Gizmag, there's a new push underway to make standing desks more affordable. Prices north of US$1,000 mean standing desks haven't been available to mainstream consumers, but prices between $100 and $500 make them a more palatable option for the general public. The latest piece of furniture to fit this mold is StandDesk, which is not only relatively affordable but also adjustable between heights suitable for sitting and standing. It offers users the best of both worlds. Read More
— Around The Home

Cardboard desk promises green and affordable way to work standing up

Most people will have heard how bad it is for you to sit all day. Inactivity can cause obesity, poor posture, and general unhealthiness – which is why so many people are switching to using standing desks at work or at home. The biggest problem is how expensive they are to buy. We recently featured the UpStanding Desk, which offered an affordable solution to this problem by converting your existing desk from sitting to standing. The Cardboard Standing Desk from Chairigami offers another, even more affordable, solution. Read More
— Around The Home

UpStanding Desk offers affordable way to work on your feet

We have previously covered several innovative standing desks here at Gizmag, such as the XTable and UpWrite. These have all required starting from scratch, which is usually a costly endeavor. The UpStanding Desk offers a simpler and more affordable way to switch from sitting to standing – it's a unit that sits atop a normal desk or table, converting it into a functional standing desk. Read More
— Around The Home

Dupe creates "biological concrete" from sand, bacteria and urine

With energy production and raw material shortages becoming increasingly pertinent issues around the world, designer Peter Trimble has demonstrated a radical method of manufacture that addresses both issues. Dupe is a portable machine that uses a mixture of sand, bacteria and urine to create a material called biostone. The machine is a proof-of-concept design only and is currently set up to create a small stool, but the method can be adapted to create just about anything. Read More
— Around The Home

Karton offers recycled cardboard creations for home furniture

It's generally only when its time to pack up and move house that the typical homeowner encounters large quantities of cardboard. In bicycle helmets and vacuum cleaners, however, we have seen some innovative applications for the material beyond its use as lightweight and durable packaging. Karton, a cardboard furniture company offering everything from beds to room dividers, takes a similar approach, yet aims to go beyond the novel and make its paper constructions a charming and practical part of your living solution. Read More
— Around The Home

Cimagine introduces true markerless augmented reality system

When you want to augment a digital image creation onto the real world, you'll likely need to point your smart device's camera at the kind of markers found in Sony's TV Size Guide tool or on the front cover of magazines like Esquire. IKEA took this idea a step further by making its 2014 catalog the marker, but a new system from Israel's Cimagine Media uses a tablet or smartphone camera and sensors to position the virtual object in a room without the need for physical markers. Read More
— Science

Carbon nanotubes used to create a flame-retardant coating for furniture

Your furniture could kill you. According to the US National Fire Protection Association, nearly 20 percent of home fire deaths between 2006 and 2010 occurred in fires where upholstered furniture was the first item to ignite. It's actually not so much the exterior fabric that burns, as it is the foam beneath it. With that in mind, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used carbon nanotubes to create a coating for that foam, that reduces its flammability by 35 percent. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement