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Fuel

Robotics

Fuelmatics and Husky develop petrol-pumping robot

There was a time when pulling into a service station would coincide with an attendant in a pressed uniform and a peaked cap running up to your car to ask if you’d like to fill ‘er up. That scene may be relegated to Mad Men, but a robotic replacement has arrived. At this month’s 2013 PEI Convention at the NACS Show in Atlanta, the Husky Corporation’s booth played host to a robotic fuel attendant called the Fuelmatics Automatic Refueling System (ARS) that the company is developing in collaboration with Stockholm-based Fuelmatics Systems AB.Read More

Magic Tank keeps your car going when the gas runs out

Keeping a jerry can of gasoline in your car may help if you run out of fuel, but it's also highly dangerous and is therefore illegal in most places. According to the Makers of Magic Tank Emergency Fuel, their product is the safe – and legal – alternative to packing a jug of gas. Read More

Architecture

"Algae-powered" building opens in Germany

Splitterwerk Architects and engineering firm Arup have unveiled what is thought to be the world's first building to be powered partly by algae. Officially "unveiled" at the International Building Exhibition hosted in Hamburg, the design, dubbed the BIQ, has a "bio-adaptive" facade that is claimed to be a first for using algae within its glass louvers in order to generate energy, and provide shade, to a working building.Read More

Environment

Simpler, cheaper way to make liquid methanol fuel using CO2 and sunlight

Most previous methods of producing methanol from carbon dioxide have involved lots of electricity, high pressures and high temperatures, and used toxic chemicals or rare earth elements like cadmium or tellurium. A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) has developed a new method they claim is safer, less expensive, and simpler than current approaches and can be scaled up to an industrial scale to allow some of the CO2 emitted from electrical power plants to be captured and converted into a useful fuel.Read More

Environment

Genetically modified microorganism could convert atmospheric CO2 into fuel

While much research is being done on capturing carbon dioxide emissions at their source to reduce the amount expelled into the atmosphere, researchers at the University of Georgia’s Bioenergy Systems Research Institute have taken a different approach to tackle the problem. Taking a leaf out of the process used by plants to convert CO2 into something useful, they have uncovered a way to take CO2 from the atmosphere and transform it into useful industrial products, including, potentially, fuel.Read More

Environment

Recycled plastic waste to fuel Sydney to London Cessna flight

British pilot Jeremy Rowsell is set to fly solo from Sydney to London in a Cessna 182 aircraft powered solely by diesel derived from "end-of-life" plastic (ELP) waste. If all goes to plan, the endeavor will set a new record time for the journey in a single-engine piston plane, and represent a compelling argument for the viability of ELP as a fuel source. Read More

Marine

Diesel engine concept gets go-ahead from UK Ministry of Defence

Britain’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) has confirmed that it is continuing funding for a new diesel outboard engine for the Royal Navy’s rigid inflatable craft. Currently under development by Cox Powertrain, the prototype marine engine concept uses opposed pistons. It is part of a policy adopted by NATO countries for converting to heavy oil wherever possible, to simplify logistics and reduce the use of petrol at sea.Read More

Aircraft

First-ever dual in-flight refueling of a pair of F-35C fighters

For the first time, a pair of F-35C Joint Strike Fighters have simultaneously refueled from a KC-130 tanker aircraft. The aircraft's afterburners burn an enormous amount of fuel, so an important part of most missions will be refueling before or after combat, or both. This is why the successful dual refueling is an important benchmark for the JSF family. Read More

Space

NASA and CSA begin testing satellite refueling on the ISS

NASA and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) have begun practicing satellite refueling in space on a test bed outside the International Space Station (ISS). In a series of tests that started on January 14 and are scheduled to continue until the 25th, the two space agencies are using the Robotic Refueling Module (RRM) and Canada’s Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, or Dextre, robot to carry out simulated refueling operations. The purpose of these tests is to develop refueling methods aimed at extending the life of satellites and reducing the amount of space debris orbiting the Earth.Read More

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