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Fuel Cell

kraftwerk runs on gas and promises to recharge an iPhone up to 11 times before needing a r...

Battery packs like the iCruiser are handy for recharging mobile devices off-the-grid, but they soon run out of juice, which isn't ideal if you'll be away from mains power for an extended period of time. You could go solar with a device like the Waka Waka, but then there's the worry of getting enough rays. Another option may be on the way in the form of kraftwerk: a prototype fuel cell power pack for USB-powered devices that runs from gas canisters and promises to charge an iPhone up to 11 times before needing a refill.  Read More

The Upp hydrogen fuel cell mobile charger

Portable hydrogen-powered fuel cell chargers, such as the Horizon MiniPak, have been around for a few years now. The Upp ups the capacity offering 25 Wh and works in conjunction with an companion app that provides device info and details of locations to find new cartridges.  Read More

Green concept cars 2014

Not only was 2014 a great year for sports concepts, it was a great year for green cars. Environmentally friendly production cars like the Toyota Mirai fuel cell vehicle and Volkswagen Golf GTE made their debuts and numerous concepts provided a window into a cleaner commuting future, showcasing technologies that will get us from point A to point B without so much impact on the rest of the alphabet. Here are our favorite green concept cars from the year.  Read More

The Audi A7 Sportback h-tron quattro

One of the biggest tech stories at this year's LA Auto Show was the fuel cell car. Toyota led the way by launching the Mirai, and Volkswagen slid a fuel cell powertrain into the Golf SportWagen. Audi showed a sportier, more luxurious side to fuel cells in the A7 Sportback h-tron quattro. Ingolstadt calls it the "first performance fuel cell vehicle."  Read More

Volkwagen's Golf SportWagen HyMotion in Los Angeles (Photo: C.C. Weiss/Gizmag)

Joining the likes of Toyota and Honda, Volkswagen has chosen this week to unveil a new fuel cell vehicle – the Golf SportWagen HyMotion. According to VW, the demo car illustrates the automaker's strategy of implementing alternative drives into existing high-production vehicles, as opposed to starting from scratch by creating entirely new models.  Read More

Toyota's Mirai is the result of 20 years of R&D

On the night before its official launch, Toyota President Akio Toyoda announced that the company's fuel cell vehicle (FCV) will be called the "Mirai." The name, which means "future" in Japanese, marks what the car maker sees as a turning point in automotive technology with the development of both a hydrogen-powered vehicle and an expanded hydrogen fueling infrastructure.  Read More

Honda's FCV Concept

A year ago this month, Honda unveiled its hydrogen fuel cell-powered FCEV Concept. The car represents the basic platform upon which the successor to the automaker's currently-available (but limited-production) FCX Clarity fuel cell vehicle will be based. Yesterday in Japan, Honda revealed a refined version of the FCEV, in the form of the FCV Concept.  Read More

Researchers at the University of Utah have created a jet-fuel powered fuel cell that runs ...

Engineers at the University of Utah have developed and built the very first fuel cell using jet fuel that operates at room-temperature without the need to ignite the fuel. Using enzymes to help produce electricity, these new fuel cells have the potential to power everything from portable electronic devices to cars and off-grid power systems.  Read More

Airbus is helping fund a project examining the potential for hydrogen fuel cells to replac...

With the airline industry's commitment to halve 2005 CO2 emission levels by 2050 prompting Airbus and others to accelerate the development of alternative jet fuels, Airbus is now getting behind a project to examine the potential for using hydrogen fuel cells on commercial airliners – not to power the jet engines, but to replace the Auxiliary Power Units (APUs).  Read More

The Stanford University water splitter could save hydrogen producers billions of dollars (...

A new emissions-free device created by scientists at Stanford University uses an ordinary 1.5-volt battery to split water into hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature, potentially providing a low-cost method to power fuel cells in zero-emissions vehicles and buildings.  Read More

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