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Fruit

Biology

Tomato growth boosted with a spray of nanoparticles

Fans of The Simpsons may recall Lisa using genetic engineering to create a super tomato that she hoped would cure world hunger. Now researchers at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) have come close to the real thing, not through genetic engineering, but with the use of nanoparticles. Although the individual fruit aren't as large as Lisa's creation, the team's approach has resulted in tomato plants that produced almost 82 percent more fruit by weight, with the fruit also boasting higher antioxidant content.Read More

Wassily fruit bowl keeps your fruit in suspense

There aren't many ways in which the design of the humble fruit bowl can be improved upon. You can change the shape, size, and material it's made from, but it's still just a vessel in which to store fruit. However, designers at Scaleno have added one simple element to its fruit bowl which improves it in a number of different ways.Read More

Science

Human trials planned for genetically-modified "super bananas"

According to the Queensland University of Technology's Prof. James Dale, 650,000 to 700,000 children die worldwide every year due to pro-vitamin A deficiency. Many of those children live in East African nations such as Uganda. Dale's proposed solution? Take something that's already grown and eaten there, and genetically modify it to produce the needed vitamin. That's what he's done with the Highland cooking banana. The resulting "super bananas" are about to be the subject of human nutritional trials in the US. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Compound in fruits and vegetables prevents symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mice

Alzheimer's disease represents the most common form of dementia, with the early stages of the disease generally characterized with short term memory loss and learning difficulties that increase in severity as the patient progresses in age. Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, California, have discovered that with regular treatments of the antioxidant fisetin, they were able to prevent memory loss in mice with genetic mutations linked to Alzheimer's.Read More

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