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Fruit

Science

Sniffing out the real-time chemical signature of ripening fruit

Using technology to sniff out food that's gone bad isn't a new idea – we've seen sensors that use carbon nanotubes to detect spoiled meat, and smart caps that can spot bad milk. Now, researchers in the United Kingdom have successfully identified the chemical signature of ripening mangoes. The findings could be extended to other fruit, and might one day revolutionize how everyone from farmers to supermarket workers tell if their fruit is ready.Read More

Science

Silk coating makes for fresher fruit

How often do you end up throwing out fruit that spoiled before you could eat it? Well, it may soon be happening a lot less, thanks to a silk-based coating being developed at Tufts University in Massachusetts. Strawberries treated with the substance remained fresh and juicy for up to a week without refrigeration – unlike their untreated counterparts.Read More

Biology

Tomato growth boosted with a spray of nanoparticles

Fans of The Simpsons may recall Lisa using genetic engineering to create a super tomato that she hoped would cure world hunger. Now researchers at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) have come close to the real thing, not through genetic engineering, but with the use of nanoparticles. Although the individual fruit aren't as large as Lisa's creation, the team's approach has resulted in tomato plants that produced almost 82 percent more fruit by weight, with the fruit also boasting higher antioxidant content.Read More

Wassily fruit bowl keeps your fruit in suspense

There aren't many ways in which the design of the humble fruit bowl can be improved upon. You can change the shape, size, and material it's made from, but it's still just a vessel in which to store fruit. However, designers at Scaleno have added one simple element to its fruit bowl which improves it in a number of different ways.Read More

Science

Human trials planned for genetically-modified "super bananas"

According to the Queensland University of Technology's Prof. James Dale, 650,000 to 700,000 children die worldwide every year due to pro-vitamin A deficiency. Many of those children live in East African nations such as Uganda. Dale's proposed solution? Take something that's already grown and eaten there, and genetically modify it to produce the needed vitamin. That's what he's done with the Highland cooking banana. The resulting "super bananas" are about to be the subject of human nutritional trials in the US. Read More

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