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Food

Slack bot collaborates on taco orders

Launched in 2013, Slack took just two years to pass the million daily users mark and now boasts more than 2.3 million users, 675,000 of which pay for the privilege. That's a lot of users and a lot of mouths to feed. Taco Bell is looking to help do just that with a bot that will take orders via the cloud-based team collaboration tool.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Food-tracking necklace listens to you eat

The sound that you hear while chewing could become the next way of monitoring your caloric intake. That's the idea behind what researchers from the University at Buffalo in the US and Northeastern University in China are doing – they're creating a necklace-like device that monitors the sound of chewing, and matches that sound to the calories of the food being consumed.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Fruit and veg intake shown to have long-lasting benefits in cutting breast cancer risk

The general health benefits of eating fruit and vegetables are well known, but researchers have provided young women with yet another reason to eat their greens. A large-scale study carried out by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, which followed thousands of women for several years, has found a strong correlation between a high-fiber diet during adolescence and young adulthood and a reduced risk of developing breast cancer later in life.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Natural plant pigment makes for diabetic-friendly bread

Good for news for people with diabetes, and it's edible, too. Scientists at the National University of Singapore have created a bread with anthocyanin, a plant pigment that helps slow digestion, which helps the body keep glucose levels in the blood under control. The team hopes it will help pave the way for a new market of healthier food products for people who have to manage their diabetes.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Dangerous bacteria molecules discovered in processed foods

Everyone knows that processed foods aren't exactly good for the human body, but a new study by researchers at the University of Leicester has shed more light on exactly why that's the case. The scientists have detected dangerous molecules called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are linked to numerous conditions, including Type 2 diabetes. Perhaps most interestingly, it is believed that the dangerous molecules could potentially be removed without impacting cost or taste.Read More

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