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Folding

An Occam Cycle prototype, in its hometown of Chicago

We've recently been hearing a lot about last-mile transit solutions – simple forms of transportation that people can use to travel short distances, going to and from train or bus stations. Compact folding bikes are a good example, as they can be carried on public transit vehicles. The Occam Cycle is optimized for that purpose, in that it has a very simple design ... just don't plan on sitting while you ride it.  Read More

Rahul Agarwal's Polygons folds into four different volume measurements

Beautiful in its simplicity, Rahul Agarwal's Polygons measuring spoon design is a multi-hinged piece of flat polypropylene that folds into four different volume measurements, from a teaspoon to two tablespoons, depending on how you pick it up.  Read More

A self-folding mobile prototype developed by researchers at MIT and Harvard (Photo: Harvar...

An origami-inspired robot that self-assembles and then scuttles away under its own power has been revealed by researchers from Harvard University and MIT. Still in the experimental stage, the prototype is able to transform itself from a flat structure into a moving, functional machine in around four minutes before scrambling away under its own power at a speed of about 2 in (5 cm) per second.  Read More

The Caseboard is an electric skateboard that folds in half for carrying like a briefcase w...

Electric skateboards can be a great way to get around town, but it's a different story when it's time to get off the board. The battery and motor that make things so cruisy when the board is underfoot have the opposite effect when its tucked under your arm. And it's not just the weight, with electric skateboards generally featuring a longboard form factor that can be unwieldy to carry. That's why Adam Riley of Epic Skateboards has developed the Caseboard, an electric skateboard that folds in half for carrying like a briefcase when not getting users from A to B.  Read More

The IzzyBike definitely has a look of its own

Bike chains can be dirty and noisy, so an increasing number of manufacturers are choosing to replace them with belt drives. Polish inventor Marek Jurek, however, has gone a step further with his IzzyBike prototype. Its drivetrain is built right into the front wheel hub, which gives it some claimed advantages over other bikes – besides there being less mess.  Read More

The Rmdlo is a lightweight folding colander

The colander (strainer) is unlikely to be top of many people's list of things that need reinventing. That said, a folding, lightweight take on the utensil called the Rmdlo seems to have captured people's imaginations, having exceeded its Kickstarter campaign target with time left to run.  Read More

The Sada Bike folds down small, but has full-size wheels

While we've already seen folding bicycles that pack down into a pretty tiny package, such small-folding bikes usually have at least one limiting factor – puny wheels that limit speed and road-worthiness, not to mention aesthetics. The Sada Bike, however, features full-size 26-inch hubless wheels, yet is about the size of an umbrella when folded.  Read More

Gi has announced an electric folding smart-bike called the GiBike

Bikes are an area of constant innovation, with their simplicity and popularity making them ripe for adaptation. But how much functionality can you squeeze into one bike? Cycle firm Gi has tried to find out by creating what it says is "the lightest, safest, folding smart eBike."  Read More

The Darwin prototype on display

When you want to climb or sprint on your bike, what do you do? That's right, you get your butt off the saddle and shift your weight forward. According to Tampa-based inventor Felton Zimmerman, however, going off-saddle like that hampers your performance. His solution? The Darwin Bicycle. It features a folding frame that automatically moves the saddle forward with you, so you're always seated.  Read More

The Foldscope is made mostly of cardstock, and can be shipped flat-packed

According to the World Health Organization, there were approximately 207 million cases of malaria worldwide in 2012, 627,000 of which proved fatal. Unfortunately, the disease most often occurs in developing nations, where diagnostic equipment may not be available. This means that doctors can't determine the particular strain of malaria from which a patient is suffering, and thus don't know which medication will work best. Manu Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at the Stanford School of Medicine, hopes to change that ... using his disposable folding paper microscope.  Read More

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