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Flexible

In 2012, Dr. Yong Zhu and a team at North Carolina State University created highly conductive and elastic conductors made from silver nanowires. At the time, Dr. Zhu said the conductors could be used to create stretchable electronics with applications in wearable, multifunctional sensors. Two years later, the NC State researchers have developed just such a sensor. Read More
OLED technology has already enabled LG and Samsung to produce TVs with curved displays, but now LG has gone one step further with the unveiling of an OLED TV with a changeable curvature. Revealed at CES, the TV is the latest salvo in the ongoing TV battle between the two Korean electronics giants. Read More
Scientists at the New Jersey Institute of Technology have joined the ranks of those from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Stanford University and LG, by creating prototype flexible batteries. Designed for use in electronic devices with flexible displays, they could conceivably be manufactured in any size or shape, or even made at home. Read More
It looks like LG and Samsung are at it again. Both companies were vying for our attention at CES 2013 with simultaneous "world's first" curved OLED television announcements. LG consistently led in the race to the consumer space, and looked liked being first to move the screen format onto smartphones with the announcement earlier this month of its plans to mass produce flexible OLED phone displays. Samsung had other ideas, however, and the Galaxy Round was launched just a few days later. LG has now caught up with the forthcoming release of its slightly larger G Flex smartphone, featuring a curved display that follows the contour of the face. Read More
Researchers at the non-profit Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) have created a new design for an organic solar cell that retains good efficiency while being flexible, thin, and almost completely transparent. Put together, these characteristics may make the cells an ideal candidate for building-integrated photovoltaics. Read More
Apparently some big companies have decided that curved displays are the next big thing. Just a few days after LG told us about its upcoming flexible displays, Samsung has done one better by announcing its first phone with a flexible display, the Galaxy Round. Read More
If you make hybrid bicycles, how do you get yours to stand out from the kazillion others currently on the market? Well, as with anything, it helps if customers can customize it. That’s the approach that Alter Cycles is taking, with its new commuter bikes. By swapping in different down tubes, the stiffness of the ride can be altered to suit the rider. Read More
Ensuring the dulcet tones of your keynote speaker reach every nook and cranny of a crowded conference room can be something of a challenge. Even perfectly-positioned box speakers and a powerful sound system might leave some guests wondering what exactly was said. Italian audio specialist K-array has come up with a distinctly bendy answer to the problem of placing speakers in those awkward, out of reach places. The Anakonda KAN200 is so flexible it can be wrapped around lamp stands or table legs, mounted to curved surfaces, or quite literally be tied in knots. It promises crisp, intelligible audio, and can be combined with other units to form one seamless sound line over 200 ft in length. Read More
These days it seems software and technology can take design beyond feasible construction in the real world through its increasing ability to create fantastical projects and shapes in a virtual domain. Interdisciplinary design studio MammaFotogramma hope to go someway towards bridging this virtual to reality design gap through the development of a flexible wood surfacing material named WoodSkin. This wood and mesh composite product can be applied to static structures whilst facilitating movement and maintaining some form of visual appeal. Read More
A study conducted at Columbia University has revealed that even when stitched together from much smaller fragments, large sheets of graphene still retain much of their mechanical properties. The discovery may be a crucial step forward in the mass-production of carbon nanotubes that could be used to manufacture flexible electronics, ultra-light and strong materials, and perhaps even the first space elevator. Read More
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