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Fish

Biology

Small-brained elephantnose fish can think big like humans

Fish may be smarter than we thought. Not only can some recognize human faces, but others can use their senses in a way that it was believed only humans and other mammals could manage. A team of zoologists at the University of Bonn has discovered that, despite lacking a complex brain, the African elephantnose fish can swap between its electrical and visual senses in the same way a person can switch between sight and touch.Read More

Biology

Fish – yes fish – can distinguish one human face from another

The old myth about goldfish having a three-second memory has already been thoroughly busted, but now researchers have provided more evidence of fish's recall abilities. They have discovered a species of tropical fish can distinguish one human face from another, which is something believed to require a more sophisticated brain than many animals, including fish, are thought to possess.Read More

Environment

Scientists take the fish out of fish food

It's one of the great environmental ironies of aquaculture – although the fish themselves come from farms, the food that they're raised on still contains wild-caught fish. A few years ago, however, a study showed that prawns could be fed microbes instead of fish byproducts. Now, a more recent study has concluded the same thing about tilapia, one of the most farmed fish in the world.Read More

Science

Genetically-engineered "skinbow" fish are multicolored marvels

The digital artists working for major movie studios like Disney and Pixar are no longer the only ones who can make outrageously-colored animals. Scientists at Duke university have genetically engineered a zebrafish to have myriad hues in its outer layer of skin, and the effect is dazzling. They call their creation "skinbow," an amalgam of the words "skin" and "rainbow."Read More

Science

Nosy fish inspires help for the eyes

Presbyopia is a common visual condition, in which the eye's lens stiffens to the point that it can't focus on close objects. Glasses, surgery and regular contact lenses do help, but they also cause a loss in contrast, sensitivity and night vision. That's why scientists from the University of Wisconsin, Madison are developing an alternative – self-focusing contacts that are inspired by a fish.Read More

Biology

Salmon the first genetically engineered animal to get FDA approval for human consumption

Following what it describes as an "exhaustive and rigorous scientific review," the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced the approval of the first ever genetically-modified animal for human consumption. The engineered salmon in question has had its DNA altered in such a way that it grows to market-ready size in around half the time of regular salmon, and has now been declared safe for humans and safe for the environment.Read More

Marine

eFishery fish farm feeder dispenses feed based on fish hunger levels

Fish farming seems like a great idea on paper. But a host of environmental problems can plague coastal fisheries, most due to the large amounts of waste generated by these floating factory farms. eFishery, a company based in Indonesia and run with the involvement of TED Prize director Amy Novogratz, hopes to alleviate waste problems that result from both over and underfeeding of fish with the development of a smart feeding device that bases the amount of feed dispensed on fish behaviour.Read More

Biology

Fish that produce their own sunscreen could inspire improved UV protection

If you happen to be frolicking around in some tropical waters at some point in the future, you may have the marine life circling your feet to thank for keeping your shoulders from roasting. Scientists have uncovered a technique used by zebrafish and various other animals to create their own sunscreen and recreated it in the lab. They say the method could one day be used to produce sunscreen and other pharmaceuticals for humans.Read More

Biology

Scientists create beef that's high in fatty acids found in fish

We frequently hear that eating fish is a healthy thing to do, because it's full of beneficial long chain fatty acids. Unfortunately, the Western diet tends to be short on fish and bigger on beef, which contains short chain fatty acids that aren't quite so good for us. Chinese scientists are creating a work-around, however – genetically-engineered beef that's high in the "good" fatty acids.Read More

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